in-

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English in-, from Old English in- ‎(in, into, prefix), from Proto-Germanic *in ‎(in, into), from Proto-Indo-European *en ‎(in, into). More at in.

Alternative forms[edit]

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. Prefixed to certain words to give the senses of in, into, towards, within.
    inhold, intake, inthrill
    inborn, inbound
    infield, infighting, insight, inwork
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin in. Sometimes the Latin word has passed through French before reaching English (e.g. incise, incite, incline, indication).

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. in, into
    Note: Before certain letters, in- becomes:

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin in- ‎(not). Sometimes the Latin word has passed through French before reaching English (e.g. incapable, incertainty, inclement, incompatible). Compare un-.

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. (non-productive) Used with certain words to reverse their meaning
    Note: Before certain letters, in- becomes:
    1. (non-productive) Added to adjectives to mean not
      inedible
      inaccurate
    2. (non-productive) Added to nouns to mean lacking or without
      incredulity
      ineptitude
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in-.

Prefix[edit]

in- ‎(before l il-, before b, m, or p im-, before r ir-)

  1. in- ; un- (reversal of meaning or lack of an attribute)

Derived terms[edit]



Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. from the adverb in
  2. prepended to a noun or adjective, it reinforces the quality signified thereby
  3. prepended to an adjective to negate its meaning; occurs mostly in borrowed terms from French: in-, un-



French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin in-.

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. in-; un- (indicates negation)

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. en-
  2. endo-
  3. intra-

Derived terms[edit]



Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (assimilated form before b-/p-/m-): im-
  • (assimilated form before l-): il-
  • (assimilated form before r-): ir-
  • (assimilated form before g-): ī-
  • (assimilated form before n-): ig-

Etymology[edit]

From earlier *en-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥- ‎(not), zero-grade form of the negative particle *ne ‎(not). Akin to ne-, , .

Particle[edit]

in-

  1. un- negation prefix
  2. not; negating particle

Usage notes[edit]

The spelling of the particle changes in some situations:

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  • Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, page 301

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From in ‎(in). More at in

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. in, into; on, upon
    inblāwan ‎(to inspire, breathe upon)
    inēodan ‎(to enter)
    inēþung ‎(inspiration)
  2. internal, positioned on the inside, inside
    incoþu ‎(internal disease)
    indryhten ‎(distinguished, noble, courtly, excellent), from indryhtu ‎(honor, glory, nobility)
  3. (intensifying) very
    infrōd "very old, experienced, wise", from frōd "wise"

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • im- (before P or B)
  • ir- (before R)

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. un-; not

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in-

Prefix[edit]

in-

  1. not (negation)

Zulu[edit]

Prefix[edit]

in- ‎(full noun prefix, basic form n-)

  1. Class 9 noun prefix.

Usage notes[edit]

The form in- is used in most cases, but im- is used before stems beginning with a labial consonant (m, b or p).

See also[edit]