barba

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Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin barba.

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbes)

  1. chin
  2. beard
  3. baleen

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Provençal barba, from Latin barba, from earlier *farba, from Proto-Italic *farβā, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰeh₂ (beard).

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbes)

  1. chin
    Synonyms: mentó, barbó, barbeta
  2. beard
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Verb[edit]

barba

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of barbar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of barbar

Further reading[edit]


Cimbrian[edit]

Noun[edit]

barba m (plural barben)

  1. uncle

References[edit]

  • “barba” in Umberto Martello Martalar, Alfonso Bellotto, Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Setti Communi vicentini, 1st edition, 1974.

Emilian[edit]

Emiliano-Romagnolo Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eml

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin barba.

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbi)

  1. (Mirandolese) beard

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From barbo (beard) +‎ -a (adjectival suffix).

Adjective[edit]

barba (accusative singular barban, plural barbaj, accusative plural barbajn)

  1. of or related to beards
  2. (of people) having a beard, beardy

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

barba

  1. third-person singular past historic of barber

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese barba, from Latin barba.

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbas)

  1. beard
  2. chin
  3. (ornithology) barb (of a feather)

Synonyms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

barba (plural barbas)

  1. beard

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin barba, from earlier *farba, from Proto-Italic *farβā, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰeh₂ (beard).

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbe)

  1. beard
  2. (botany) root, rootlet
  3. (zoology) barb
  4. (colloquial) bore, drag, yawn

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the above term, from the fact that a beard represents a grown man.

Noun[edit]

barba m

  1. (northern Italy, Switzerland) uncle

Synonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

barba (beard)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From earlier *farba, with initial b- assimilated to -rb, from Proto-Italic *farβā, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰeh₂ (beard). Compare also barbātus.

Noun[edit]

barba f (genitive barbae); first declension

  1. beard (facial hair)
    Barba non facit philosophum.
    A beard does not make a philosopher.
    Video barbam et pallium; philosophum nondum video.
    I see a beard and cloak; a philosopher I don’t yet see.
  2. (figuratively) wool, down on a plant
Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative barba barbae
genitive barbae barbārum
dative barbae barbīs
accusative barbam barbās
ablative barbā barbīs
vocative barba barbae
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 69

Etymology 2[edit]

A variant form of the Medieval Latin barbās (paternal uncle).

Noun[edit]

barba m (genitive barbae); first declension

  1. Alternative form of barbās
Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative barba barbae
genitive barbae barbārum
dative barbae barbīs
accusative barbam barbās
ablative barbā barbīs
vocative barba barbae

References[edit]

  • barba in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • barba in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “BARBA2”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre, page 2. BARBA
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to grow one's hair, beard long: promittere crinem, barbam
  • barba in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • barba in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Piedmontese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin barba.

Noun[edit]

barba m

  1. uncle

Portuguese[edit]

barba

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese barba, barva, from Latin barba (beard), from earlier *farba, from Proto-Italic *farβā, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰeh₂ (beard).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbas)

  1. beard

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:barba.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin barba, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰ-eh₂- (compare English beard). Compare meaning of "uncle" to Friulian barbe, Italian barba, Dalmatian buarba.

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbas)

  1. beard

Noun[edit]

barba m (plural barbas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) uncle

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) aug
  • (Sutsilvan) oc, ô

Coordinate terms[edit]

  • (with regards to gender):
    • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) onda
    • (Vallader) anda
    • (Puter, Vallader) tanta

Sicilian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin barba.

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbi)

  1. beard

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin barba, from earlier *farba, from Proto-Italic *farβā, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰardʰeh₂ (beard).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

barba f (plural barbas)

  1. beard
  2. chin

barba m (plural barbas)

  1. beardy, bearded man
  2. (archaic) the part of an old man (in a play)
  3. (archaic) the villain (of a play)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]