inimitable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French inimitable, from Latin inimitabilis, corresponding to in- +‎ imitable.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inimitable (comparative more inimitable, superlative most inimitable)

  1. Beyond imitation, surpassing all others; matchless.
    Antonyms: imitable, commonplace
    • 1697, J[ohn] Evelyn, “Instructions How to Collect, and Procure such Medals as are Antique, and Rare; and to Distinguish the True from the False, for the Prevention of Frauds and Impostures”, in Numismata. A Discourse of Medals, Antient and Modern. [], London: [] Benj[amin] Tooke [], OCLC 1179530046, page 201:
      Moreover, a perfect Medal has its Profile and out-ſtroaks ſharp (Nummus aſper) and by no means rugged; the Figures clean and well poliſh'd; the Contours neatly trimm'd, and exactly round and carefully preſerv'd; that the Extancy and Relievos correſpond with the Ingraving, and have not ſuffer'd in Percuſſion; in all which, there is a certain Spirit of Antiquity and Excellency to be diſcern'd in Antient Medals almoſt inimitable.

Usage notes[edit]

Not to be confused with inimicable (harmful, hostile).

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

in- +‎ imitable.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inimitable (plural inimitables)

  1. unmatched, uncontestable, inimitable

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inimitable (plural inimitables)

  1. inimitable

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]