incarnate

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ecclesiastical Latin incarnatus, past participle of incarnari (be made flesh), from in- + caro (flesh).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

incarnate (not comparable)

  1. Embodied in flesh; given a bodily, especially a human, form; personified.
    • Milton
      Here shalt thou sit incarnate.
    • Jortin
      He represents the emperor and his wife as two devils incarnate, sent into the world for the destruction of mankind.
  2. (obsolete) Flesh-colored, crimson.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the past participle stem of Latin incarnare (make flesh), from in- + caro (flesh).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

incarnate (third-person singular simple present incarnates, present participle incarnating, simple past and past participle incarnated)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To incarn; to become covered with flesh, to heal over.
  2. (transitive) To make carnal, to reduce the spiritual nature of.
  3. (transitive) To embody in flesh, invest with a bodily, especially a human, form.
    • Milton
      This essence to incarnate and imbrute, / That to the height of deity aspired.
  4. (transitive) To put into or represent in a concrete form, as an idea.
Translations[edit]

Quotations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

in- +‎ carnate

Adjective[edit]

incarnate (not comparable)

  1. Not in the flesh; spiritual.
    • Richardson
      I fear nothing [] that devil carnate or incarnate can fairly do.

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

incarnate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of incarnare
  2. second-person plural imperative of incarnare
  3. feminine plural of incarnato

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

incarnāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of incarnō