inward

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English inward, from Old English inweard, corresponding to in +‎ -ward.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inward (comparative more inward, superlative most inward)

  1. Situated on the inside; that is within, inner; belonging to the inside. [from 9th c.]
  2. Not superficially obvious, inner, not expressed, especially relating to mental or spiritual faculties as opposed to external ones.
  3. Moving or tending toward the inside.
  4. (archaic, of a voice) Not directed toward the outside world, and thus quiet or indistinct.
  5. (obsolete) Internal to a particular place or country; not foreign, domestic.
  6. (obsolete) Secret, private, kept hidden.
  7. (obsolete) Coming from one’s inmost or sincerest feelings; heartfelt, earnest.
  8. (obsolete) Intimate, closely acquainted; familiar, close. [16th–17th c.]
  9. (obsolete) Devoted to spiritual matters, pious, devout.
  10. (obsolete, of animals) Tame.
  11. (obsolete, of medicines) Internal; applied through the stomach by being swallowed.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

inward (not comparable)

  1. Towards the inside. [from 11th c.]
  2. Towards one’s mind, thoughts, or internal self.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book III”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      So much the rather, thou Celestial Light, / Shine inward.
    • 2005, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, David Kessler, On Grief and Grieving, →ISBN, page 16:
      You also may experience feelings of guilt, which is anger turned inward on yourself.
  3. (obsolete) On the inside, within, inside.
  4. (obsolete) In one’s mind, thoughts, or internal self.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

inward (plural inwards)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly in the plural) That which is inward or within; the inner parts or organs of the body; the viscera.
    • 1653, Jeremy Taylor, “Twenty-five Sermons Preached at Golden Grove; Being for the Winter Half-year, []: Sermon XII. Of Lukewarmness and Zeal; or, Spiritual Fervour. Part I.”, in Reginald Heber, editor, The Whole Works of the Right Rev. Jeremy Taylor, D.D. [], volume V, London: Ogle, Duncan, and Co. []; and Richard Priestley, [], published 1822, OCLC 956524510, page 176:
      [T]his man is a servant of the eyes of men, and offers parchment or a white skin in sacrifice, but the flesh and the inwards he leaves to be consumed by a stranger fire.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book X”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Then sacrificing, laid the inwards and their fat.
  2. (obsolete, chiefly in the plural) The mental faculties or other characteristics not immediately apparent.
  3. (obsolete) A familiar friend or acquaintance.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for inward in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English inweard; equivalent to in +‎ -ward.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈinward/, /ˈinwaːrd/

Adverb[edit]

inward

  1. inwards, to the interior, especially referring to:
    1. One's physical existence or body
    2. One's mental state or soul
  2. While located within the inside of an entity, especially referring to:
    1. One's physical existence or body
    2. One's mental state or soul

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: inward
  • Scots: inward

References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inward (superlative ynwardest)

  1. inside, inward, in the interior; the following special senses exist:
    1. For the inside; internal
    2. religious, inside the mind
  2. emotionally powerful, emotionally true
  3. unknown, esoteric

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

inward (plural inwardes)

  1. The interior of a given thing
  2. innards; guts
  3. reasoning, deductive ability

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Preposition[edit]

inward

  1. To the inside

References[edit]

See also[edit]