feeling

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Feeling

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English felynge, equivalent to feel +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfiːlɪŋ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfilɪŋ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːlɪŋ

Adjective[edit]

feeling (comparative more feeling, superlative most feeling)

  1. Emotionally sensitive.
    Despite the rough voice, the coach is surprisingly feeling.
  2. Expressive of great sensibility; attended by, or evincing, sensibility.
    He made a feeling representation of his wrongs.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

feeling (plural feelings)

  1. Sensation, particularly through the skin.
    The wool on my arm produced a strange feeling.
  2. Emotion; impression.
    The house gave me a feeling of dread.
    • 2022 January 12, Paul Bigland, “Fab Four: the nation's finest stations: London Bridge”, in RAIL, number 948, page 31:
      Part of the 'western arcade' (as it's known) is lined with delis, cafes and other shops, giving it the feeling of a bazaar.
  3. (always in the plural) Emotional state or well-being.
    You really hurt my feelings when you said that.
  4. (always in the plural) Emotional attraction or desire.
    Many people still have feelings for their first love.
  5. Intuition.
    He has no feeling for what he can say to somebody in such a fragile emotional condition.
    I've got a funny feeling that this isn't going to work.
  6. An opinion, an attitude.
    • 1972, George J. W. Goodman (Adam Smith), Supermoney, page 156:
      When you are tempted to speculate in cocoa, lie down until the feeling goes away.

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from feeling (noun)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: feeling
  • German: Feeling
  • Italian: feeling
  • Spanish: feeling

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

feeling

  1. present participle of feel

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. instinct, hunch

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

feeling m (invariable)

  1. an intense and immediate current of likability that is established between two people; feeling

References[edit]

  1. ^ feeling in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

feeling m

  1. feeling, hunch

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English feeling.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfilin/, [ˈfi.lĩn]

Noun[edit]

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. feeling, hunch
  2. spark; attraction; feeling

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.