hiss

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English hissen, probably of onomatopoeic origin. Compare Middle Dutch hissen, hisschen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hɪs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Noun[edit]

hiss (plural hisses)

  1. A sibilant sound, such as that made by a snake or escaping steam; an unvoiced fricative.
  2. An expression of disapproval made using such a sound.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

hiss (third-person singular simple present hisses, present participle hissing, simple past and past participle hissed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a hissing sound.
    As I started to poke it, the snake hissed at me.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To condemn or express contempt (for someone or something) by hissing.
    The crowd booed and hissed her off the stage.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii]:
      If the tag-rag people did not clap him and hiss him, according as he pleased and displeased them, as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true man.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Ezekiel 27:36:
      The merchants among the people shall hiss at thee []
    • 1653, Henry More, chapter XII, in An Antidote against Atheisme, or An Appeal to the Natural Faculties of the Minde of Man, whether There Be Not a God, London: [] Roger Daniel, [], OCLC 228721837, book I, page 102:
      VVherefore this Religious affection vvhich nature has implanted, and as ſtrongly rooted in Man as the feare of death or the love of vvomen, vvould be the moſt enormous ſlip or bungle ſhe could commit, ſo that ſhe vvould ſo ſhamefully faile in the laſt Act, in this contrivance of the nature of Man, that inſtead of a Plaudite ſhe vvould deſerve to be hiſſed off the Stage.
    • 1793, Elizabeth Inchbald, Every One Has His Fault, London: G.G.J. and J. Robinson, Prologue,[4]
      The Play, perhaps, has many things amiss:
      Well, let us then reduce the point to this,
      Let only those that have no failings, hiss.
    • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, Letter 5, p. 145,[5]
      As the culprits went through the town and plantations they were laughed at, hissed, and hooted by the slaves []
    • 1961, Walker Percy, The Moviegoer, New York: Ivy Books, 1988, Part 1, Chapter 4, p. 38,[6]
      How well I remember, her stepmother told her, the days when we Wagnerians used to hiss old Brahms—O for the rapturous rebellious days of youth.
  3. (transitive) To utter (something) with a hissing sound.
    • 1761, Robert Lloyd, An Epistle to C. Churchill, London: William Flexney, page 7,[7]
      Lies oft o’erthrown with ceaseless Venom spread,
      Still hiss out Scandal from their Hydra Head,
    • 1855, Alfred Tennyson, “Maud”, in Maud, and Other Poems, London: Edward Moxon, [], OCLC 1013215631, page 20:
      the long-necked geese of the world that are ever hissing dispraise []
    • 2011 December 14, John Elkington, “John Elkington”, in The Guardian[8]:
      It turns out that the driver of the red Ferrari that caused the crash wasn't, as I first guessed, a youngster, but a 60-year-old. Clearly, he had energy to spare, which was more than could be said about a panel I listened to around the same time as the crash. Indeed, someone hissed in my ear during a First Magazine awards ceremony in London's imposing Marlborough House on 7 December: "What we need is more old white men on the stage."
    • 2012, Hilary Mantel, Bring Up the Bodies, New York: Henry Holt, Part 2, “Master of Phantoms,”
      All day from the queen’s rooms, shouting, slamming doors, running feet: hissed conversations in undertones.
  4. (intransitive) To move with a hissing sound.
    The arrow hissed through the air.
    • 1718, Alexander Pope (translator), The Iliad of Homer, London: Bernard Lintott, Volume 4, Book 15, lines 690-691, p. 192,[9]
      The Troops of Troy recede with sudden Fear,
      While the swift Javelin hiss’d along in Air.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, “Influence of Natural Objects” in Poems by William Wordsworth, London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Volume 1, p. 46,[10]
      All shod with steel
      We hissed along the polished ice []
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), London: James R[ipley] Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., [], OCLC 13623666:
      All the preceding afternoon and night heavy thunderstorms had hissed down upon the meads, and washed some of the hay into the river []
    • 1997, Annie Proulx, “Brokeback Mountain” in Close Range: Brokeback Mountain and Other Stories, London: Harper Perennial, 2005, p. 283,[11]
      Ennis del Mar wakes before five, wind rocking the trailer, hissing in around the aluminum door and window frames.
  5. (transitive) To emit or eject (something) with a hissing sound.
  6. (transitive) To whisper, especially angrily or urgently.
    • 1881, Elim Henry D'Avigdor, Across Country[15], Bradbury, Agnew:
      "Are you quite sure of it," she hissed into his ear, "Mr Fang, Junior?"
    • 1968, James A. Emanuel, Theodore L. Gross, Dark symphony, →ISBN:
      "Oh please," she said, "don't let him see us!" I wouldn't let her push me away. "Stop!" she hissed. "He'll see us!"

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Arabic حِسّ(ḥiss). Compare to Turkish his.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hiss (definite accusative hissi, plural hislər)

  1. feeling, sensation
    Synonym: duyğu

Usage notes[edit]

The final double consonant in Azerbaijani nouns is usually reduced in the locative and ablative singular and plural; hiss and küll are exceptions to this rule, as they would otherwise be confused with his and kül ( “Azərbaycan dilində hansı sözlərin yazılışının dəyişəcəyi açıqlanıb”, in Report.az[16], January 2018).

Declension[edit]

    Declension of hiss
singular plural
nominative hiss
hisslər
definite accusative hissi
hissləri
dative hissə
hisslərə
locative hissdə
hisslərdə
ablative hissdən
hisslərdən
definite genitive hissin
hisslərin
    Possessive forms of hiss
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) hissim hisslərim
sənin (your) hissin hisslərin
onun (his/her/its) hissi hissləri
bizim (our) hissimiz hisslərimiz
sizin (your) hissiniz hissləriniz
onların (their) hissi or hissləri hissləri
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) hissimi hisslərimi
sənin (your) hissini hisslərini
onun (his/her/its) hissini hisslərini
bizim (our) hissimizi hisslərimizi
sizin (your) hissinizi hisslərinizi
onların (their) hissini or hisslərini hisslərini
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) hissimə hisslərimə
sənin (your) hissinə hisslərinə
onun (his/her/its) hissinə hisslərinə
bizim (our) hissimizə hisslərimizə
sizin (your) hissinizə hisslərinizə
onların (their) hissinə or hisslərinə hisslərinə
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) hissimdə hisslərimdə
sənin (your) hissində hisslərində
onun (his/her/its) hissində hisslərində
bizim (our) hissimizdə hisslərimizdə
sizin (your) hissinizdə hisslərinizdə
onların (their) hissində or hisslərində hisslərində
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) hissimdən hisslərimdən
sənin (your) hissindən hisslərindən
onun (his/her/its) hissindən hisslərindən
bizim (our) hissimizdən hisslərimizdən
sizin (your) hissinizdən hisslərinizdən
onların (their) hissindən or hisslərindən hisslərindən
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) hissimin hisslərimin
sənin (your) hissinin hisslərinin
onun (his/her/its) hissinin hisslərinin
bizim (our) hissimizin hisslərimizin
sizin (your) hissinizin hisslərinizin
onların (their) hissinin or hisslərinin hisslərinin

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hiss

  1. singular imperative of hissen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of hissen

Middle English[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hiss

  1. Alternative form of his (his)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From h +‎ -iss.

Noun[edit]

hiss m (definite singular hissen, indefinite plural hissar, definite plural hissane)

  1. (music) B-sharp

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From hissa (hoist). Attested since 1824.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hiss c

  1. elevator, lift

Declension[edit]

Declension of hiss 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hiss hissen hissar hissarna
Genitive hiss hissens hissars hissarnas