saur

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Saur and -saur

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contracted from Irish salachar (filth, nastiness), from salach (nasty), from sal (filth, refuse). (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Noun[edit]

saur

  1. (Britain, dialect) soil; dirt
  2. (Britain, dialect) dirty water
  3. (Britain, dialect) urine from a cowhouse

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for saur in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin soror, with the variant form seraur deriving from the Latin accusative form sorōrem. Compare Romanian soră, suroră, sor, Italian suora, Old Italian suoro, French soeur, Old Spanish seror, Spanish sor, Friulian sûr, Romansch sora, sour.

Noun[edit]

saur f

  1. sister

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French saur, from Old French sor, from Frankish *sōri, *saur (dry), from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz (dry, parched). Cognate with Old English sēar (dry). More at sear.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

saur (feminine singular saure, masculine plural saurs, feminine plural saures)

  1. (cooking) dried and smoked

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saurr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

saur m (genitive singular saurs, no plural)

  1. filth, dirt
  2. feces

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse saurr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [súːɾ], [sɞ́ːɣəɾ], [sɞ́ʊ̯ːɾ], [sɑ́ʊ̯ːɾ], [séʊ̯ːɾ]
    Rhymes: -ɞ́ʊ̯ːɾ

Noun[edit]

saur m

  1. mote, speck, particle, dust
    Ji a fått’n saur (or söur) ti öjgä
    I have received a mote in the eye.
    Han gav mäg int’n saur’n gång
    He gave me not the slightest mote.

Related terms[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “SAUR”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 559