sire

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Sire, şire, šire, and šíře

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sire, from Old French sire, the nominative singular of seignor; from Latin senior, from senex. Doublet of senior, seigneur, seignior, sir, and monsieur.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /saɪə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)
  • (file)
As King of England, William III would be addressed as Your Majesty or sire.
Darley Arabian, one of the foundation sires of the thoroughbred breed of horse.

Noun[edit]

sire (plural sires)

  1. A lord, master, or other person in authority, most commonly used vocatively: formerly in speaking to elders and superiors, later only when addressing a sovereign.
  2. A male animal; a stud, especially a horse or dog, that has fathered another.
  3. (obsolete) A father; the head of a family; the husband.
  4. (obsolete) A creator; a maker; an author; an originator.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sire (third-person singular simple present sires, present participle siring, simple past and past participle sired)

  1. (transitive, of a male) to procreate; to father, beget, impregnate.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German zieren.

Verb[edit]

sire

  1. (archaic) adorn
  2. (archaic, by extension, especially in the passive participle) endow with a favorable quality

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sire (nominative form), from Vulgar Latin *seior (used as a term of address), a contracted form of Latin senior (compare French seigneur, derived from the accusative form), perhaps influenced by maior. Doublet of senior.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sire m (plural sires)

  1. (obsolete) sire (term of respect)
  2. (obsolete) lord

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French sire. See also sere. Doublet of signore.

Noun[edit]

sire m (invariable)

  1. king, monarch
    only when addressing a sovereign

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sire, nominative singular of seignor, from Latin senior. Doublet of senyour.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsiːr(ə)/, /ˈsir(ə)/

Noun[edit]

sire (plural sires)

  1. Used preceding the name or title of a knight, noble, or cleric.
  2. A respectful term of address for a noble or gentleman.
  3. A noble or lord; one of high station.
  4. A husband as the head of a household.
  5. A father as one's progenitor.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: sir; sire
  • Scots: sir; sire

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sire m

  1. nominative singular of sieur

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sire

  1. locative singular of siras

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Verb[edit]

sire (Cyrillic spelling сире)

  1. third-person plural present of siriti

Slovene[edit]

Noun[edit]

sire

  1. accusative plural of sir