amo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: amó, amò, amö, Amo., and амо

Afar[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo

  1. head

Bikol Central[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo (amô) (Bikol Naga)

  1. monkey
    Synonym: ukay

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo m (plural amos, feminine ama)

  1. owner (of a piece of land or real estate, a business, etc.)
  2. master

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of amar

Chickasaw[edit]

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. to mow

Chuukese[edit]

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. may
  2. to let
    • 2010, Ewe Kapasen God, United Bible Societies, →ISBN, Könupin 58:7-8, page 775:
      Amo repwe mȯronȯ ussun chok konik mi chok nichino. Amo repwe pachchacheno ussun chok ekkewe fetin won aan. Amo repwe ussun chok ekkewe pwechar sia puriretiw. Amo repwe ussun chok emon mönukon mi mȧ nupwen a uputiw.
      Let them disappear like water leaking. Let them stick like the grass on the ground. Let them be like the snail we step on. Let them be like a newborn who is dead when he is born.

Classical Nahuatl[edit]

Particle[edit]

amo

  1. Alternative spelling of ahmo

Ese[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo

  1. father

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ami +‎ -o.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈamo/
  • Hyphenation: am‧o
  • Rhymes: -amo
  • Audio:
    (file)

Noun[edit]

amo (accusative singular amon, plural amoj, accusative plural amojn)

  1. love
    • Kiu dissemas amon, tiu rikoltos la samon.
      Whoever sows love will harvest the same.
      —Proverb by Morteza Mirbaghian
    • Edmond Privat, Vivo de Zamenhof, Ĉapitro 2,
      Similaj amoj inter filo kaj patrino ĉe multaj geniuloj estas ofte rimarkeblaj. Pope, Musset, Lamartine adoris la patrinon sian, kaj al ŝi tre multon ŝuldis. Same Zamenhof.
      Similar close relationships (lit. loves) between sons and mothers can often been seen in geniuses. Pope, Musset and Lamartine all adored their mothers and owed much to them. The same was true of Zamenhof.

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From ama (mistress), from Hispanic Late Latin amma, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *amma- (mother).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo m (plural amos)

  1. (archaic) tutor
    Synonym: titor
  2. (archaic) steward
    Synonym: mordomo
  3. master
    Synonyms: dono, patrón, propietario

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of amar

References[edit]

  • amo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • amo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • amo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • amo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • amo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Hawaiian[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo

  1. burden

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. (transitive) to carry (on the shoulders)

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Esperanto amo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo (plural ami)

  1. love

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin hāmus. Compare Spanish hamo, French hameçon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo m (plural ami)

  1. hook
  2. (figuratively) bait
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of amare

Further reading[edit]

  • amo in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Karao[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo

  1. master

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

amo m (Latin spelling)

  1. boss, owner

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Proto-Indo-European *am-a-, *am- (mother, aunt), a lost nursery-word of the papa-type. Compare amita (aunt), Old High German amma (nurse). Alternatively, O. Hackstein suggests Proto-Indo-European *h₂emh₃- (seize).

Verb[edit]

amō (present infinitive amāre, perfect active amāvī, supine amātum); first conjugation

  1. I love
  2. I am fond of, I like
    Synonyms: diligo, probo, approbo, comprobo Antonyms: improbo, reprobo
  3. I am pleased by or with (someone or something) for (a particular reason): I derive pleasure from...(for...), I delight in...(for...)
    Synonym: dēlector (passive voice of delecto only)
  4. I am thankful to, I am grateful to
  5. I feel a sense of obligation (to or for): I am/feel obligated to, I am/feel obliged for
    Synonym: obligor (passive voice of obligo only, and that only as used in expressing a feeling of obligation, as opposed to any acknowledgement of formal or legal obligation)
    • 68 BCE – 44 BCE, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum Epistula CXXIII:
      De raudusculo Numeriano multum te amo.
      Regarding Numerius' bit of coin I am quite obliged to you. (the phrase raudusculo Numeriano, "Numerius' bit of coin", here refers to a small monetary debt assumedly having been owed by Cicero to Numerius, and paid for Cicero by Atticus)
  6. (with infinitive) to enjoy, be accustomed
    Synonyms: fruor, assuefio
Conjugation[edit]
   Conjugation of amō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amō amās amat amāmus amātis amant
imperfect amābam amābās amābat amābāmus amābātis amābant
future amābō amābis amābit amābimus amābitis amābunt
perfect amāvī amāvistī, amāstī1 amāvit amāvimus amāvistis, amāstis1 amāvērunt, amāvēre
pluperfect amāveram amāverās amāverat amāverāmus amāverātis amāverant
future perfect amāverō amāveris amāverit amāverimus amāveritis amāverint
passive present amor amāris, amāre amātur amāmur amāminī amantur
imperfect amābar amābāris, amābāre amābātur amābāmur amābāminī amābantur
future amābor amāberis, amābere amābitur amābimur amābiminī amābuntur
perfect amātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect amātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect amātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amem amēs amet amēmus amētis ament
imperfect amārem amārēs amāret amārēmus amārētis amārent
perfect amāverim amāverīs amāverit amāverīmus amāverītis amāverint
pluperfect amāvissem, amāssem1 amāvissēs, amāssēs1 amāvisset, amāsset1 amāvissēmus, amāssēmus1 amāvissētis, amāssētis1 amāvissent, amāssent1
passive present amer amēris, amēre amētur amēmur amēminī amentur
imperfect amārer amārēris, amārēre amārētur amārēmur amārēminī amārentur
perfect amātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect amātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amā amāte
future amātō amātō amātōte amantō
passive present amāre amāminī
future amātor amātor amantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives amāre amāvisse, amāsse1 amātūrum esse amārī amātum esse amātum īrī
participles amāns amātūrus amātus amandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
amandī amandō amandum amandō amātum amātū

1At least one rare poetic syncopated perfect form is attested.

Old forms:

Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart: aliquem toto pectore, ut dicitur, amare (Leg. 18. 49)
    • to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)

Etymology 2[edit]

See hama.

Noun[edit]

amō f (genitive amōnis); third declension

  1. medieval spelling of hama
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative amō amōnēs
Genitive amōnis amōnum
Dative amōnī amōnibus
Accusative amōnem amōnēs
Ablative amōne amōnibus
Vocative amō amōnēs

References[edit]

  • amo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • amo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • amo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • amo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart: aliquem toto pectore, ut dicitur, amare (Leg. 18. 49)
    • to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “amo”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 41/2

Maori[edit]

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. carry (on a litter)
  2. charge, attack

Maquiritari[edit]

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. to cry, weep

References[edit]

  • Ed. Key, Mary Ritchie and Comrie, Bernard. The Intercontinental Dictionary Series, Carib (De'kwana).

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese amo, from ama.

Noun[edit]

amo m (plural amos)

  1. master
  2. boss

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of amar

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /âːmo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧mo

Adverb[edit]

ȃmo (Cyrillic spelling а̑мо)

  1. hither, here
  2. this way

Synonyms[edit]


Shabo[edit]

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. (intransitive) to come

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Back-formation from ama.

Noun[edit]

amo m (plural amos, feminine ama, feminine plural amas)

  1. master (man who owns a slave)
  2. owner, master, keeper (man who owns an animal)

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

amo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of amar.

Further reading[edit]


Tsou[edit]

Noun[edit]

amo

  1. father