amok

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree).

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

The term first popped up in English around the 16th century, associated with the people of Malaysia and Java, first described in the 1516 text "The Book of Duarte Barbosa: An Account of the Countries Bordering on the Indian Ocean and Their Inhabitants", which was translated to English by Stanley.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

amok (comparative more amok, superlative most amok)

  1. Out of control, especially when armed and dangerous.
  2. In a frenzy of violence, or on a killing spree; berserk.

Usage notes[edit]

Almost exclusively used in the phrase run amok.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

amok (plural amoks)

  1. One who runs amok; in Malay and Moro/Philippine culture, one who attempts to kill many others, especially expecting that they will be killed themselves.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English amok, from Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree). Displaced amog.

Verb[edit]

amok

  1. to run amok

Noun[edit]

amok

  1. one who runs amok

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown.

Noun[edit]

amok

  1. a surf; waves that break on an ocean shoreline

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English amok, from Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree).

Noun[edit]

amok m

  1. Condition of amok behaving.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English amok or from Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree).

Adjective[edit]

amok

  1. Out of control, especially when armed and dangerous.
  2. In a frenzy of violence, or on a killing spree; berserk.

Usage notes[edit]

Almost exclusively used in the phrase gå amok.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Malay amuk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

amok n (uncountable)

  1. (historical) A murderous frenzy, a killing spree in Malay culture.
  2. (historical) One who runs amok, someone who is on such a killing spree.
  3. uproar, riot, noise

Descendants[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English amok, from Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree).

Noun[edit]

amok

  1. amok (one who runs amok)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of amok (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative amok amokit
genitive amokin amokien
partitive amokia amokeja
illative amokiin amokeihin
singular plural
nominative amok amokit
accusative nom. amok amokit
gen. amokin
genitive amokin amokien
partitive amokia amokeja
inessive amokissa amokeissa
elative amokista amokeista
illative amokiin amokeihin
adessive amokilla amokeilla
ablative amokilta amokeilta
allative amokille amokeille
essive amokina amokeina
translative amokiksi amokeiksi
instructive amokein
abessive amokitta amokeitta
comitative amokeineen

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English amok, from Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree).

Adverb[edit]

amok

  1. amok

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English amok, from Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree).

Adverb[edit]

amok

  1. amok

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English amok, from Portuguese amouco, from Malay amuk (to go on a killing spree).

Noun[edit]

amok m (Cyrillic spelling амок)

  1. Condition of amok behaving.