mania

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mania, from Ancient Greek μανία (manía, madness).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmeɪ.ni.ə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ma‧ni‧a
  • Rhymes: -eɪniə

Noun[edit]

mania (countable and uncountable, plural manias)

  1. Violent derangement of mind; madness; insanity.
  2. Excessive or unreasonable desire; insane passion affecting one or many people; fanaticism.
    • 1831, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Romance and Reality, volume 1, page 233:
      One of the manias of the present day, which especially excites my spleen, is the locomotive rage which seems to possess all ranks—that necessity of going out of town in the summer...
    • 2013 July 20, “The attack of the MOOCs”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      Dotcom mania was slow in coming to higher education, but now it has the venerable industry firmly in its grip. Since the launch early last year of Udacity and Coursera, two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations.
  3. (psychiatry) The state of abnormally elevated or irritable mood, arousal, and/or energy levels.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mania at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mania or Ancient Greek μανία (manía, madness).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mania f (plural manies)

  1. mania

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑniɑ/, [ˈmɑniɑ]
  • Rhymes: -ɑniɑ
  • Syllabification: ma‧ni‧a

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mania, from Ancient Greek μανία (manía, madness).

Noun[edit]

mania

  1. mania
Declension[edit]
Inflection of mania (Kotus type 12/kulkija, no gradation)
nominative mania maniat
genitive manian manioiden
manioitten
partitive maniaa manioita
illative maniaan manioihin
singular plural
nominative mania maniat
accusative nom. mania maniat
gen. manian
genitive manian manioiden
manioitten
maniainrare
partitive maniaa manioita
inessive maniassa manioissa
elative maniasta manioista
illative maniaan manioihin
adessive manialla manioilla
ablative manialta manioilta
allative manialle manioille
essive maniana manioina
translative maniaksi manioiksi
instructive manioin
abessive maniatta manioitta
comitative manioineen
Possessive forms of mania (type kulkija)
possessor singular plural
1st person maniani maniamme
2nd person maniasi manianne
3rd person maniansa

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mania

  1. partitive singular of mani

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mania

  1. first-person singular past historic of manier

Anagrams[edit]


Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

mania (transitive)

  1. to follow instructions, obey
  2. to worship

References[edit]

  • Burling, R. (2003) The Language of the Modhupur Mandi (Garo) Vol. II: The Lexicon[1], Bangladesh: University of Michigan, page 389

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mania, from Ancient Greek μανία (manía, madness).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈni.a/
  • Rhymes: -ia
  • Hyphenation: ma‧nìa

Noun[edit]

mania f (plural manie)

  1. mania
  2. habit (if strange)
  3. quirk
  4. bug
  5. one-track mind
    Synonyms: fissazione, assillo, smania, pallino fisso, chiodo fisso
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin imāgō, imāginem.[1] Doublet of immagine and imago.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈma.nja/
  • Rhymes: -anja
  • Hyphenation: mà‧nia

Noun[edit]

mania f (plural manie)

  1. (archaic) a waxen votive image, usually hung from altars
    • 1867, Costantino Medici, Leggenda di san Domenico [Legend of Saint Dominic]‎[2], Venice: A. Clementi, page 121:
      Disperatosi dunque d'ogni aiutorio umano botossi a Cristo Signore, et al beato messer san Domenico, e volendo in segno di devozione offrere una mania di cera a quella quantità ch'era elli, tolse un filo di stoppa, e cominciò a misurare la lunghezza e la larghezza del corpo suo.
      Then, unable to hope in any human help, he devoted himself to Christ the Lord, and to the blessed sir Saint Dominic, and wishing to offer, as a sign of devotion, a waxen image in the size he was, he took an oakum thread, and started measuring the length and width of his own body.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • mania in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • mania in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti, Olivetti Media Communication
  1. ^ maniato in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek μανία (manía).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mania f (genitive maniae); first declension

  1. craze, mania, madness
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mania maniae
Genitive maniae maniārum
Dative maniae maniīs
Accusative maniam maniās
Ablative maniā maniīs
Vocative mania maniae
Descendants[edit]

  • Italian: mania
  • Old Portuguese: manna
  • Romanian: mânie
  • Albanian: mëri, mëni (disputed)
  • Catalan: mania
  • Danish: mani
  • Dutch: manie
  • English: mania
  • Finnish: mania
  • French: manie
  • German: Manie
  • Irish: máine
  • Norwegian: mani
  • Polish: mania
  • Portuguese: mania
  • Spanish: manía
  • Swedish: mani

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mānia

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural of mānis

References[edit]

  • mania in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mania in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • mania in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mania in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mania, from Ancient Greek μανία (manía).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): //ˈmaɲ.ja// invalid IPA characters (//)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

mania f

  1. mania (violent derangement)
    Synonyms: amok, obsesja, szajba, szał
  2. mania (excessive desire)
  3. (psychiatry) mania (state of abnormally elevated or irritable mood, arousal, and/or energy levels)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mania in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mania in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mania or Ancient Greek μανία (manía, madness).

Noun[edit]

mania f (plural manias)

  1. mania (excessive or unreasonable desire)
  2. vice (bad habit)
    Synonym: vício

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French manier.

Verb[edit]

a mania (third-person singular present maniează, past participle maniat1st conj.

  1. to handle

Conjugation[edit]


Tahitian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mania

  1. (of the sea or weather) calm
  2. (figuratively) serene, calm, tranquil, peaceful (state of mind)
  3. dull

References[edit]