waxen

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English waxen, from Old English weaxen, ġeweaxen, from Proto-Germanic *wahsanaz, past participle of Proto-Germanic *wahsijaną (to wax, grow, increase), equivalent to wax +‎ -en (past participle ending).

Adjective[edit]

waxen (comparative more waxen, superlative most waxen)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Grown.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

waxen

  1. (archaic) alternative past participle of wax.
  2. (obsolete) plural simple present of wax
    • 1540, Great Bible, Second Edition, Preface
      And they that occupye them been in muche savegarde, and have greate consolacyon, and been the readyer unto all goodnesse, the slower to all evyll: and if they have done anything amysse, anone even by the sight of the bookes, theyr conscvences been admonished, and they waxen sory and ashamed of the facte.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender
      When the rayne is faln, the cloudes wexen cleare.
    • 1590-97, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, II, i
      And then the whole quire hold their hips and laugh,
      And waxen in their mirth and neeze and swear
      A merrier hour was never wasted there.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English waxen (made of wax), from Old English weaxen (waxen, made of wax), equivalent to wax +‎ -en (made of).

Adjective[edit]

waxen (comparative more waxen, superlative most waxen)

  1. Made of wax; covered with wax.
    a waxen tablet
  2. Of or pertaining to wax.
  3. Having the pale smooth characteristics of wax, waxlike, waxy.
    • 1950, Mervyn Peake, Gormenghast, Penguin, 1969, Chapter 28, p. 185,[2]
      It was hard to imagine that the broken thing had once been new; that those withered, waxen cheeks had been fresh and tinted. That her eyes had long ago glinted with laughter.
  4. (rare) Easily effaced, as if written in wax.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈwaksən/, /ˈwɛksən/

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English weaxan, from Proto-West Germanic *wahsijan, from Proto-Germanic *wahsijaną.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

waxen

  1. To grow (become larger):
    1. To grow up; to become fully grown.
      • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[3], published c. 1410, Matheu 13:31-32, page 6v, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
        An oþer parable iheſus puttide foꝛþ to hem. / ⁊ ſeide / þe kyngdom of heuenes is lijk to a coꝛn of ſeneuey · which a man took ⁊ ſewe in his feeld · / which is þe leeſt of alle ſeedis / but whanne it haþ woxen .· it is the mooſt of alle woꝛtis · ⁊ is maad a tre / ſo þe bꝛiddis of þe eir comen ⁊ dwellen in þe bowis þerof.
        Jesus put another parable forwards to them, saying: "The Kingdom of Heaven is like a mustard seed that a person took and sowed in their field; / it is the smallest of all seeds, but when it has grown, it is the largest of all plants; it becomes a tree, so the birds of the air come and nest in its branches."
    2. To wax (of the moon); to rise (of the tide).
  2. To increase in amount; to multiply
  3. To increase in magnitude; to magnify
  4. To appear; to arise.
  5. To change; to turn (to or into something)
  6. To become, to assume (a quality or state)
Usage notes[edit]

Already in Old English, this verb's conjugation varied; in Northumbria, the original class 6 conjugation was retained, while elsewhere, the verb went over to class 7; this variation persists in Middle English. Further variation results from levelling of forms during the Middle English period.

Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: wax
  • Scots: wax
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From wax (wax) +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

waxen

  1. to wax (apply wax to; cover in wax)
  2. (rare) to stop (a hole)
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From wax (wax) +‎ -en (made of).

Adjective[edit]

waxen

  1. (hapax) waxen (made of wax)
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]