mold

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See also: mōld, Mold, and Mold.

English[edit]

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Cast and mold

Alternative forms[edit]

  • mould (British spelling, Canadian spelling, Australian spelling)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: mŏld, mōld
  • (UK) IPA(key): /məʊld/, /mɔʊld/
  • (US) IPA(key): /moʊld/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊld

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English molde (mold, cast), from Old French modle, mole, from Latin modulus, from Latin modus. Doublet of module and model.

Noun[edit]

mold (countable and uncountable, plural molds) (American spelling)

  1. A hollow form or matrix for shaping a fluid or plastic substance.
  2. A frame or model around or on which something is formed or shaped.
  3. Something that is made in or shaped on a mold.
  4. The shape or pattern of a mold.
  5. General shape or form.
    the oval mold of her face
    • 1711, Alexander Pope, "The Temple of Fame", in The Works of Alexander Pope: New Ed. Including Several Hundred Unpublished Letters, and Other New Materials, Collected in Part by John Wilson Croker. With Introd. and Notes by Whitwell Elwin, Volume 1, J.Murray, p.206
      Crowned with an architrave of antique mould.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314:
      This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. [] Indeed, all his features were in large mold, like the man himself, as though he had come from a day when skin garments made the proper garb of men.
  6. Distinctive character or type.
    a leader in the mold of her predecessors
  7. A fixed or restrictive pattern or form.
    His method of scientific investigation broke the mold and led to a new discovery.
  8. (architecture) A group of moldings.
    the arch mold of a porch or doorway;  the pier mold of a Gothic pier, meaning the whole profile, section, or combination of parts
  9. (anatomy) A fontanelle.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

mold (third-person singular simple present molds, present participle molding, simple past and past participle molded) (American spelling)

  1. (transitive) To shape in or on a mold; to form into a particular shape; to give shape to.
    • 1910, Walter A. Wells, The hygienic, economic and sociologic aspect of the throat[1], volume 20, number 1, DOI:10.1288/00005537-191001000-00004, pages 47–48:
      Not only in formal discourse, but in the ordinary walks of life, a well-modulated, expressive voice is a most valuable asset, whether one’s object be to interest, persuade or convince, to give a command or entreat a favor. The moulding of the voice into finished articulate speech is a mechanism in which the entire oral cavity, including palate, teeth, tongue and lips, take an important part. As a result of either structural defect of these organs, or, as is more often the case, as a consequence of their imperfect innervation, various logopathies may occur, which profoundly affect the social status of the unfortunate individual and seriously embarrass his way to a successful career.
      Lisping, stuttering, stammering, lallation, nunnation and sigmatism, paragammacism and paralambdacism are but few of the locutory evils encountered, much too frequently in adolescents and adults. The fact that they are mostly amenable to treatment and may often be completely corrected, with proper attention and training, is something that needs to be more thoroughly impressed upon our educational bodies and sociologic reformers.
    • 1978, Job 10:8-9, Old Testament, New International Version:
      Your hands shaped me and made me … Remember that you molded me like clay.
  2. (transitive) To guide or determine the growth or development of; influence
    • 1963. Haile Selassie (translated)
      It is you who must mold the minds of your students that they may be wise, farsighted, intelligent, profound in their thinking, devoted to their country and government and fruitful in their work. It is you who must sense as the example.
  3. (transitive) To fit closely by following the contours of.
  4. (transitive) To make a mold of or from (molten metal, for example) before casting.
  5. (transitive) To ornament with moldings.
  6. (intransitive) To be shaped in or as if in a mold.
    These shoes gradually molded to my feet.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Penicillium mold on mandarin oranges

From Middle English mowlde, noun use and alteration of mowled, past participle of mowlen, moulen (to grow moldy), from Old Norse mygla (compare dialectal Danish mugle), from Proto-Germanic *muglōną, diminutive and denominative of *mukiz 'soft substance' (compare Old Norse myki, mykr (cow dung)), from Proto-Indo-European *mewk- (slick, soft). More at muck and meek.

Noun[edit]

mold (countable and uncountable, plural molds) (American spelling)

  1. A natural substance in the form of a woolly or furry growth of tiny fungi that appears when organic material lies for a long time exposed to (usually warm and moist) air.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

mold (third-person singular simple present molds, present participle molding, simple past and past participle molded) (American spelling)

  1. (transitive) To cause to become moldy; to cause mold to grow upon.
  2. (intransitive) To become moldy; to be covered or filled, in whole or in part, with a mold.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English molde, from Old English molde, from Proto-Germanic *muldō (dirt, soil) (compare Old Frisian molde, Middle Dutch moude, Dutch moude, obsolete German Molte, Norwegian Bokmål mold, and Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌻𐌳𐌰 (mulda)), from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥h₂-téh₂ (compare Old Irish moll (bran), Lithuanian mìltai (flour)), from *melh₂-. More at meal.

Noun[edit]

mold (countable and uncountable, plural molds)

  1. Loose friable soil, rich in humus and fit for planting.
  2. (UK, dialectal, chiefly plural) Earth, ground.
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mold (third-person singular simple present molds, present participle molding, simple past and past participle molded) (American spelling)

  1. To cover with mold or soil.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English molde (top of the head), from Old English molda, molde, from Proto-West Germanic *moldō, from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥Hdʰṓ; exactly parallel to Sanskrit मूर्धन् (mūrdhan).

Noun[edit]

mold (uncountable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) The top or crown of the head.[1]
    • 1601, C[aius] Plinius Secundus [i.e., Pliny the Elder], “[Book VII.] The Proëme.”, in Philemon Holland, transl., The Historie of the VVorld. Commonly Called, The Natvrall Historie of C. Plinivs Secvndus. [], 1st tome, London: [] Adam Islip, published 1635, OCLC 1180792622, page 152:
      What a while continueth the mould and crowne of our heads to beate and pant, before our braine is well ſetled []
    • 1612, Sir George Paule, The life of John Whitgift [] [2], London: Ri. Chiswell, published 1699, page 118:
      By reaſon whereof the flaſhing of the Water, and ſharpness of the Air, did ſo pierce the Archbiſhop (being above Threeſcore and thirteen years of Age) that he complained the ſame night of a great cold, which he had then taken in the mould of his Head.
    • 1687, Jean de Thévenot, “Book I, Chapter II”, in Archibald Lovell, transl., Travels into the Levant[3], volume Part II, London, page 6:
      [] its eyes as large as a mans; and betwixt the two eyes, it hath a hole like the mould in the head of a man, by which it ſucks in and ſpouts out the Water []
Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “Mould, sb.2”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume VI, Part, London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 702, column 3.

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mold, from Proto-Germanic *muldō ‘dirt, soil’, from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥-tā, from *mel-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold f (genitive singular moldar, uncountable)

  1. (agriculture) earth, humus soil, humus layer

Declension[edit]

Declension of mold (singular only)
f2s singular
indefinite definite
nominative mold moldin
accusative mold moldina
dative mold moldini
genitive moldar moldarinnar

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mold, from Proto-Germanic *muldō (dirt, soil).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold f (genitive singular moldar, nominative plural moldir)

  1. dirt, mould, humus, ground, earth

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold

  1. Alternative form of molde (earth)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold

  1. Alternative form of molde (top of the head)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold

  1. Alternative form of molde (mold)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold

  1. Alternative form of molle (mole)

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

mold

  1. Alternative form of molden

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mold (earth, dirt, soil), from Proto-Germanic *muldō (mould, soil, dirt), from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, crush), from *mel- (to rub).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold f or m (definite singular molda or molden, indefinite plural molder, definite plural moldene)

  1. humus, earth, soil, topsoil

Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mold, from Proto-Germanic *muldō.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /mɔlː/

Noun[edit]

mold f (definite singular molda, uncountable)

  1. humus, earth, soil, topsoil

References[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *muldō (dirt, soil). Cognate with Old English molde (English mold), Old High German molta, Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌻𐌳𐌰 (mulda).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /mõld/

Noun[edit]

mold f (genitive moldar, plural moldir)

  1. earth, dirt, soil
    • Vǫluspá, verse 2
      [] níu man ek heima, / níu íviðjur,
      mjǫtvið mæran, / fyr mold neðan.
      [] nine worlds I remember, / nine troll-women
      a renowned tree of measure, / 'fore the earth below.

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: muld c
  • Faroese: mold f
  • Icelandic: mold f

References[edit]

  • mold in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press