mold

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See also: Mold.

English[edit]

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Cast and mold

Alternative forms[edit]

  • mould (Commonwealth spelling)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Via Middle English and Old French, from Latin modulus

Noun[edit]

mold ‎(plural molds)

  1. A hollow form or matrix for shaping a fluid or plastic substance.
  2. A frame or model around or on which something is formed or shaped.
  3. Something that is made in or shaped on a mold.
  4. The shape or pattern of a mold.
  5. General shape or form.
    the oval mold of her face
    • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
      Crowned with an architrave of antique mould.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. [] Indeed, all his features were in large mold, like the man himself, as though he had come from a day when skin garments made the proper garb of men.
  6. Distinctive character or type.
    a leader in the mold of her predecessors
  7. A fixed or restrictive pattern or form.
    His method of scientific investigation broke the mold and led to a new discovery.
  8. (architecture) A group of moldings.
    the arch mold of a porch or doorway;  the pier mold of a Gothic pier, meaning the whole profile, section, or combination of parts
  9. (anatomy) A fontanelle.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

mold ‎(third-person singular simple present molds, present participle molding, simple past and past participle molded)

  1. (transitive) To shape in or on a mold.
  2. (transitive) To form into a particular shape; to give shape to.
    • Job 10:8-9, Old Testament, New International Version:
      Your hands shaped me and made me....Remember that you molded me like clay.
  3. (transitive) To guide or determine the growth or development of; influence; as, a teacher who helps to mold the minds of his students
  4. (transitive) To fit closely by following the contours of.
  5. (transitive) To make a mold of or from (molten metal, for example) before casting.
  6. (transitive) To ornament with moldings.
  7. (intransitive) To be shaped in or as if in a mold.
    These shoes gradually molded to my feet.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Penicillium mold on mandarin oranges

From Middle English mowlde, noun use and alteration of mowled, past participle of moulen, mawlen ‎(to grow moldy), from Old Norse mygla (compare dialectal Danish mugle), from Proto-Germanic *muglōną, diminutive and denominative of *mukiz 'soft substance' (compare Old Norse myki, mykr ‎(cow dung)), from Proto-Indo-European *meuk- 'slick, soft'. More at muck and meek.

Noun[edit]

mold ‎(plural molds)

  1. ​A natural substance in the form of a woolly or furry growth of tiny fungi that appears when organic material lies for a long time exposed to (usually warm and moist) air.
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mold ‎(third-person singular simple present molds, present participle molding, simple past and past participle molded)

  1. (transitive) To cause to become moldy; to cause mold to grow upon.
  2. (intransitive) To become moldy; to be covered or filled, in whole or in part, with a mold.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English molde, from Proto-Germanic *muldō ‘dirt, soil’ (compare Old Frisian molde, Middle Dutch moude, Dutch moude, obsolete German Molte, Norwegian mold), from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥-tā (compare Old Irish moll ‘bran’, Lithuanian mìltai ‘flour’), from *mel- (compare English meal). More at meal.

Noun[edit]

mold ‎(plural molds)

  1. Loose friable soil, rich in humus and fit for planting.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mold ‎(third-person singular simple present molds, present participle molding, simple past and past participle molded)

  1. To cover with mold or soil.

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mold, from Proto-Germanic *muldō ‘dirt, soil’ from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥-tā, from *mel-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mold f (genitive singular moldar, uncountable)

  1. (agriculture) earth, humus soil, humus layer

Declension[edit]

f2s Singular
Indefinite Definite
Nominative mold moldin
Accusative mold moldina
Dative mold moldini
Genitive moldar moldarinnar

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mold, from Proto-Germanic *muldō ‎(dirt, soil).

Noun[edit]

mold f

  1. dirt, mould, humus, ground, earth

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *muldō ‎(dirt, soil). Cognate with Old English molde (English mold), Old High German molta, Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌻𐌳𐌰 ‎(mulda).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /mold/

Noun[edit]

mold f (genitive moldar, plural moldir)

  1. earth, dirt, soil
    • Vǫluspá, stanza 3, lines 7–8:
      mjǫtvið mœran
      fyr mold neðan.
      the great tree
      beneath the ground.

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]