mug

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: muğ

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: mŭg, IPA(key): /mʌɡ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡ

Etymology 1[edit]

Early 16th century (originally Scots and northern English, denoting "earthenware, pot, jug"), of unknown origin, perhaps from North Germanic (compare Swedish mugg (mug, jug), Norwegian mugge (pitcher, open can for warm drinks), Danish mugge), or Low German mokke, mukke (mug), Dutch mok (mug), also of unknown origin. "Face" sense possibly from grotesque faces on certain drinking vessels. "Assault" sense of verb possibly from hitting someone in the face.

Adjective[edit]

mug (comparative mugger, superlative muggest)

  1. (archaic) Easily fooled, gullible.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      "Great heavens! Is it?" Drummond helped himself to marmalade. "And to think that I once pictured myself skewering Huns with it. Do you think anybody would be mug enough to buy it, James?"

Noun[edit]

mug (plural mugs)

  1. A large cup for hot liquids, usually having a handle and used without a saucer.
  2. (slang) The face, often used deprecatingly.
    What an ugly mug.
  3. (slang, derogatory) A gullible or easily-cheated person.
    He's a gullible mug – he believed her again.
  4. (Britain, Australia, derogatory, slang) A stupid or contemptible person.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

(face):

(gullible person):

Descendants[edit]
  • Finnish: muki
  • Swedish: mugg
  • Welsh: mẁg
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

mug (third-person singular simple present mugs, present participle mugging, simple past and past participle mugged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, Britain) To strike in the face.
    • 1821, The Fancy, i. p.261:
      Madgbury showed game, drove Abbot in a corner, but got well Mugg'd.
    • 1857, "The Leary Man", in Anglicus Ducange, The Vulgar Tongue
      And if you come to fibbery, You must Mug one or two,
    • 1866, London Miscellany, 5 May, p.102:
      "Suppose they had Mugged you?" / "Done what to me?" / "Mugged you. Slogged you, you know."
  2. (transitive) To assault for the purpose of robbery.
  3. (intransitive) To exaggerate a facial expression for communicative emphasis; to make a face, to pose, as for photographs or in a performance, in an exaggerated or affected manner.
    The children weren't interested in sitting still for a serious photo; they mugged for the camera.
  4. (transitive) To photograph for identification; to take a mug shot.[1]
  5. (Britain, Australia, slang) To learn or review a subject as much as possible in a short time; cram.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
References[edit]
  1. ^ “mug” in John A. Simpson and Edmund S. C. Weiner, editors, The Compact Oxford English Dictionary, volume I (A–O), 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, [1989] 1991, →ISBN, page 1129/64.

References[edit]

  • mug” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  • mug at OneLook Dictionary Search

Etymology 2[edit]

Informal variant of motherfucker.

Noun[edit]

mug (plural mugs)

  1. (slang, African-American Vernacular) Motherfucker (usually in similes, e.g. "like a mug" or "as a mug")

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch mug, from Middle Dutch mugge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug (plural mugge, diminutive muggie)

  1. (chiefly diminutive) mosquito (insect, elongated fly)

Descendants[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *smuga, cognate to Old English smoca (smoke), Old Irish múch (smoke), Armenian մուխ (mux).[1]

Noun[edit]

mug m (indefinite plural mugje, definite singular mugu, definite plural mugjet)

  1. dusk, twilight

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “mug”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, page 277

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug c or n (uncountable, singular indefinite mug, singular definite muggen or mugget)

  1. mold

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch mugge, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *mugjō (midge), from Proto-Indo-European *mū- (fly, midge), *mu-, *mew-. Compare Low German mügge, German Mücke, West Frisian mich, English midge, Danish myg. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug f (plural muggen, diminutive mugje n or muggetje n)

  1. A mosquito, a gnat, any fly of the suborder Nematocera except sometimes the larger tropical species (which are commonly called muskiet).
  2. (figuratively) A bug, an insignificant individual.
    Van een mug een olifant maken
    To make a mountain out of a molehill (lit.: to make an elephant out of a mosquito)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English mug.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug m (plural mugs)

  1. A large cup, generally used to serve cold drinks, a mug.

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *mogus, from Proto-Indo-European *mogʰus (young person). Cognate with Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌲𐌿𐍃 (magus, boy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug m

  1. male slave or servant, serf, bondman
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d10
      Mógi sidi uili do Día; acht do·rigénsat in descipuil dechor etarru et déu diib: is hed on ɔsecha-som hic.
      They are all servants to God; but the disciples had made a distinction between them and (made) gods of them; that is what he corrects here.

Inflection[edit]

Masculine u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative mug mugL mogæ, moge, moga
Vocative mug mugL mugu
Accusative mugN mugL mugu
Genitive mogoH, mogaH mogo, moga mogæN, mogeN
Dative mugL mogaib mogaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

The nominative plural appears once as mógi, apparently by attraction to the i-stems.

Descendants[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug (nominative plural mugs)

  1. mouse (rodent of the family Muridae)

Declension[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]