mug

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

1560s ("bowl, pot, jug"), of unknown origin, perhaps from North Germanic (compare Swedish mugg ‎(mug, jug), Norwegian mugge ‎(pitcher, open can for warm drinks), Danish mugge), or Low German mokke, mukke ‎(mug), also of unknown origin. "Face" sense possibly from grotesque faces on certain drinking vessels. "Assault" sense of verb possibly from hitting someone in the face.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mug ‎(comparative mugger, superlative muggest)

  1. (archaic) Easily fooled, gullible.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      "Great heavens! Is it?" Drummond helped himself to marmalade. "And to think that I once pictured myself skewering Huns with it. Do you think anybody would be mug enough to buy it, James?"

Noun[edit]

mug ‎(plural mugs)

  1. A large cup for hot liquids, usually having a handle and used without a saucer.
  2. (slang) The face, often used deprecatingly.
    What an ugly mug.
  3. (slang, vulgar) A gullible or easily-cheated person.
    He’s a gullible mug – he believed her again.
  4. (UK, slang) A stupid or contemptible person.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(face):

(gullible person):

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

mug ‎(third-person singular simple present mugs, present participle mugging, simple past and past participle mugged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, UK) To strike in the face.
    • 1821, The Fancy, i. p.261:
      Madgbury showed game, drove Abbot in a corner, but got well Mugg'd.
    • 1857, "The Leary Man", in Anglicus Ducange, The Vulgar Tongue
      And if you come to fibbery, You must Mug one or two,
    • 1866, London Miscellany, 5 May, p.102:
      "Suppose they had Mugged you?" / "Done what to me?" / "Mugged you. Slogged you, you know."
  2. (transitive) To assault for the purpose of robbery.
  3. (intransitive) To exaggerate a facial expression for communicative emphasis; to make a face, to pose, as for photographs or in a performance, in an exaggerated or affected manner.
    The children weren't interested in sitting still for a serious photo; they mugged for the camera.
  4. (transitive) To photograph for identification; to take a mug shot.[1]
    • 1920, Mary Roberts Rinehart, Avery Hopwood, The Bat, chapterI:
      The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He'd never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn't run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn't swear he knew his face.
  5. Learn or review a subject as much as possible in a short time; cram.

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. A. Simpson and E. S. C. Weiner (prepared by), The Compact Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (Claredon Press, Oxford 1991 [1989], ISBN 0-19-861258-3), page 1129/64

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • mug” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  • mug at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *smuga, cognate to Old English smoca ‎(smoke), Old Irish múch ‎(id), Armenian մուխ ‎(mux)[1].

Noun[edit]

mug m (indefinite plural mugje, definite singular mugu, definite plural mugjet)

  1. dusk, twilight
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, V.Orel, Koninklijke Brill ,Leiden 2000, p.277

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug c, n ‎(uncountable, singular indefinite mug, singular definite muggen or mugget)

  1. mold

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mugjō ‎(midge), from Proto-Indo-European *mū- ‎(fly, midge), *mu-, *mew-. Compare Low German mügge, German Mücke, West Frisian mich, English midge, Danish myg.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug f, m ‎(plural muggen, diminutive mugje n or muggetje n)

  1. mosquito, except the larger tropical species, which are called muskiet
  2. (figuratively) bug, insignificant individual

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mug

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug m ‎(plural mugs)

  1. A large cup, generally used to serve cold drinks, a mug.

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug m

  1. male slave or servant, serf, bondman

Descendants[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mug ‎(plural mugs)

  1. mouse (rodent of the family Muridae)

Declension[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]