mush

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See also: Mush and MUSH

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably a variant of mash, or from a dialectal variant of Middle English mos (mush, pulp, porridge); compare Middle English appelmos (applesauce), from Old English mōs (food, victuals, porridge, mush), from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (porridge, food), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂d- (wet, fat, dripping). Cognate with Scots moosh (mush), Dutch moes (pulp, mush, porridge), German Mus (jam, puree, mush), Swedish mos (pulp, mash, mush). See also moose.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mush (countable and uncountable, plural mushes)

  1. A somewhat liquid mess, often of food; a soft or semisolid substance.
    • 1855, Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom Chapter 1
      His food is of the coarsest kind, consisting for the most part of cornmeal mush, which often finds its way from the wooden tray to his mouth in an oyster shell.
  2. (radio) A mixture of noise produced by the harmonics of continuous-wave stations.
  3. (surfing) The foam of a breaker.
    • 2008, Bucky McMahon, Night Diver (page 80)
      And Rincon was all about surfing. Flash back thirty-odd years, to a skinny kid on a Styrofoam belly-board, pin-wheeling out into the mush of Jacksonville Beach, Florida.
  4. A magmatic body containing a significant proportion of crystals suspended in the liquid phase or melt.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mush (third-person singular simple present mushes, present participle mushing, simple past and past participle mushed)

  1. To squish so as to break into smaller pieces or to combine with something else.
    He mushed the ingredients together.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

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Etymology 2[edit]

From Old High German muos and Goidelic mus (a pap) or muss (a porridge), or any thick preparation of fruit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mush (uncountable)

  1. A food comprising cracked or rolled grains cooked in water or milk; porridge.
  2. (rural US) Cornmeal cooked in water and served as a porridge or as a thick sidedish like grits or mashed potatoes.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Believed to be a contraction of mush on, from Michif, in turn a corruption of French marchons! and marche!, the cry of the voyageurs and coureurs de bois to their dogs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

mush

  1. A directive given (usually to dogs or a horse) to start moving, or to move faster.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mush (plural mushes)

  1. A walk, especially across the snow with dogs.

Verb[edit]

mush (third-person singular simple present mushes, present participle mushing, simple past and past participle mushed)

  1. (intransitive) To walk, especially across the snow with dogs.
  2. (transitive) To drive dogs, usually pulling a sled, across the snow.
    • 1910, Jack London, Burning Daylight, part 1 chapter 4:
      Together the two men loaded and lashed the sled. They warmed their hands for the last time, pulled on their mittens, and mushed the dogs over the bank and down to the river-trail.

Etymology 4[edit]

Simple contraction of mushroom.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mush (plural mushes)

  1. (Quebec, slang) A magic mushroom.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From Angloromani mush (man), from Romani mursh, from Sanskrit मनुष्य (manuṣya, human being, man).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mush (plural mushes)

  1. (Britain, slang, chiefly Southern England) A form of address to a man.
    Synonyms: mate (UK), pal (especially US)
    • (Can we date this quote?) “MAUREEN AND DOREEN AND NOREEN AND ME”, in Peculiar Poems[1]:
      'Oy, mush! Get out of it!' / That's what we'd say / Barging the locals / Out of the way
    • (Can we date this quote?) “THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING: In Which King Arthur Uther Pendragon Grants An Interview”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[2]:
      When I'm around it's not uncommon for someone to call me and say :'Oy mush, get your bum over here and give us a hand.'
  2. (Britain, slang, chiefly Northern England, Australia) The face.
    Synonym: mug
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

Compare French moucheter (to cut with small cuts).

Verb[edit]

mush (third-person singular simple present mushes, present participle mushing, simple past and past participle mushed)

  1. (transitive) To notch, cut, or indent (cloth, etc.) with a stamp.

Anagrams[edit]


Angloromani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Romani mursh, from Sanskrit मनुष्य (manuṣya, human being, man).

Noun[edit]

mush (plural mushes)

  1. man

Descendants[edit]

  • English: mush

References[edit]

  • mush” in The Manchester Romani Project, Angloromani Dictionary.