pal

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Pal, PAL, Pál, pał, pâl, päl, Pål, and päl-

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Angloromani pal (brother, friend), from Romani phral (brother), from Sanskrit भ्रातृ (bhrātṛ), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *bʰráHtā, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr. Cognates also include English brother, Ancient Greek φράτηρ (phrátēr), Latin frater.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pal (plural pals)

  1. (colloquial) A friend, buddy, mate, cobber, someone to hang around with.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pal (third-person singular simple present pals, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. Be friends with, hang around with.
    John plans to pal around with Joe today.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Angloromani[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Romani phral, from Sanskrit भ्रातृ (bhrā́tṛ), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *bʰráHtā, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *bʰráHtā, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr. Cognate with English brother.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈpʰæl], [pʰæɫ]

Noun[edit]

pal

  1. brother
    Sa see pal te pen?
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  2. friend
    Every time I tried to make a pal...
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: pal

References[edit]

  • pal” in Angloromani Dictionary.

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition pa (for) + masculine singular article el (the).

Contraction[edit]

pal m

  1. for the

Cahuilla[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa.

Noun[edit]

pál

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Katherine Siva Sauvel; Pamela Munro (1983) Chem'ivillu' (let's speak Cahuilla)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan pal, from Latin pālus (stake, pole), from Proto-Italic *pākslos, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-slos, from *peh₂ǵ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pal m (plural pals)

  1. stake
  2. pole
  3. (heraldry) pale

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Cupeño[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uto-Aztecan *pa. Cognate with Cahuilla pál, Luiseño paala, Tübatulabal bal, Northern Paiute paa, Comanche paa, Hopi paahu, Classical Nahuatl atl.

Noun[edit]

pál

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Jane H. Hill (2005) A Grammar of Cupeño

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

pal!

  1. fire! (a signal to shoot)

Verb[edit]

pal

  1. second-person singular imperative of pálit

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French pal, from Latin pālus. Cognate with paal.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pɑl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑl

Noun[edit]

pal m (plural pallen, diminutive palletje n)

  1. catch (mechanism which stops something from moving the wrong way)

Adverb[edit]

pal

  1. firm, firmly
  2. (with a preposition or adverb) right, immediately

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pālus (stake, pole). Compare the inherited doublet pieu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pal m (plural pals)

  1. stake
  2. pole
  3. (heraldry) pale

References[edit]


Interlingue[edit]

Noun[edit]

pal (plural pales)

  1. pole, stake

Kurdish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pal ?

  1. side

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Participle[edit]

pal

  1. second-person singular imperative of paliś

Occitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pal m (plural pals)

  1. post, pole, stake
  2. (nautical) mast

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pālus (stake), possibly through a late Proto-Germanic intermediate. Compare Old High German pfāl (German Pfahl), Old Dutch pāl (Dutch paal).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pāl m

  1. stake

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Pipil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Relational[edit]

-pal

  1. of (genitive relation, also forms genitive pronouns)
    Ne pelu ipal ne takat
    The dog of the man → The man's dog.
    Ashan ini kal mupal
    Now this house is yours
  2. for (benefactive relation)
    Tikpiat se mupal wan se nupal
    We have one for you and one for me

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • The relational noun -pal is part of a restricted group of relationals that can be used without a possessive marker when it accompanies an explicit complement, thus acting like a preposition:
    Ne pelu pal ne takat
    The dog of the man → The man's dog.

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pālus (stake).

Noun[edit]

pal m inan

  1. stake (piece of wood)
  2. pile (for the support of a building)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

pal

  1. second-person singular imperative of palić

Further reading[edit]

  • pal in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish[edit]

Contraction[edit]

pal

  1. (colloquial) contraction of para (for) + el (the)

Related terms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pal (nominative plural pals)

  1. parent, father or mother
  2. Hyponyms: fat, hipal, jipal, mot

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]