pall

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Páll and pal'l'

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pal, palle, from Old English pæl, pæll, from Old French paile and Latin pallium (cloak; covering) (and thus a doublet of pallium),[1][2] probably from palla (piece of cloth worn as apparel) (possibly from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (to cover, wrap; hide, skin; cloth)) + -ium (suffix forming abstract nouns).

Noun[edit]

pall (plural palls)

  1. Senses relating to cloth.
    1. (archaic, poetic) Fine cloth, especially purple cloth used for robes.
    2. A heavy cloth laid over a coffin or tomb; a shroud laid over a corpse.
    3. (Christianity) A piece of cardboard, covered with linen and embroidered on one side, used to cover the chalice during the Eucharist.
    4. (Christianity, obsolete) A cloth used for various purposes on the altar in a church, such as a corporal (cloth on which elements of the Eucharist are placed) or frontal (drapery covering the front of an altar).
  2. Senses relating to clothing.
    1. (archaic) An outer garment; a cloak, mantle, or robe.
    2. (figuratively) Something that covers or surrounds like a cloak; in particular, a cloud of dust, smoke, etc., or a feeling of fear or gloom.
      The early election results cast a pall over what was supposed to be a celebration.
      A pall came over the crowd when the fourth goal was scored.
    3. (Christianity) Especially in Roman Catholicism: a pallium (liturgical vestment worn over the chasuble).
      • 1655, Thomas Fuller, “Section II. The Seventh Century.”, in The Church-history of Britain; from the Birth of Jesus Christ, untill the Year M.DC.XLVIII, London: Printed for Iohn Williams, OCLC 3896305; The Church History of Britain, [] In Three Volumes, volume I, 3rd edition, London: Printed for Thomas Tegg, [], 1842, OCLC 779226264, section 38 (What a Pall is), page 107:
        By the way, a pall is a pontifical vestment, considerable for the matter, making, and mysteries thereof. [] But, to speak plainly, the mystery of mysteries in this pall was, that the archbishops' receiving it showed therein their dependence on Rome; and a mote, in this manner ceremoniously taken, was an acknowledgement of their subjection. And as it owned Rome's power, so in after-ages it increased their profit. For, though now such palls were freely given to archbishops, [] yet in after-ages the archbishop of Canterbury's pall was sold for five thousand florins: []
      • 1840, [Elizabeth Stone], “Needlework of the Dark Ages”, in Countess of Wilton [i.e., Mary Margaret Stanley Egerton], editor, The Art of Needle-work, from the Earliest Ages; including Some Notices of the Ancient Historical Tapestries, 2nd edition, London: Henry Colburn, publisher, [], OCLC 7523191, page 66:
        Or it might be a magnificent pall, in the days in which this garment had lost its primitive character, that taxed the skill and the patience of the fair needlewoman. It was about the year a.d. 601 that Pope Gregory [I] sent two archbishop's palls into England; the one for London, which see was afterwards removed to Canterbury, and the other to York.
    4. (heraldry) A charge representing an archbishop's pallium, having the form of the letter Y charged with crosses.
      Synonyms: cross-pall, pairle
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the noun pall (cloth).[3]

Verb[edit]

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. (transitive) To cloak or cover with, or as if with, a pall.

Etymology 3[edit]

Formed by aphesis from appal, appall ((obsolete) to make pale; to weaken; to become weak; to lose flavour or become stale),[4] possibly under the influence of the figurative meaning of the unrelated noun pall.

Alternatively, the word may be derived from Middle English pallen (to diminish, impair, weaken; to become faint; to lose spirit), formed by aphesis from apallen (to become or make faint or tired; to become indifferent; to fade or cause to fade away; to dim, weaken; to become stale; to be frightened; to frighten; to become pale),[5][2] from Old French apalir (to become or cause to become pale), possibly from Latin pallidus (pale, pallid; pale with fright, frightened; mouldy, musty),[6] from palleō (to be pale, turn pale; to be anxious or fearful; to fade or change colour) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pel-, *pelH- (grey; pale)) + -idus (suffix meaning ‘tending to’ forming adjectives).

Verb[edit]

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. (transitive) To make vapid or insipid; to make lifeless or spiritless; to dull, to weaken.
    • 1706 August 30, Francis Atterbury, A Sermon Preach’d in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul; at the Funeral of Mr. Tho. Bennet, August 30. 1706, London: Printed and sold by H. Hills, [], published 1707, OCLC 219971976, page 4:
      [] Reaſon and Reflection, which by repreſenting perpetually to the mind of Man the meanneſs of all ſenſual Gratifications, do, in great meaſure, blunt the edge of his keeneſt Deſires, and pall all his Enjoyments.
  2. (intransitive) To become dull, insipid, tasteless, or vapid; to lose life, spirit, strength, or taste.
    The liquor palls.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From the verb pall (to make vapid).[7]

Noun[edit]

pall (plural palls)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A feeling of nausea caused by disgust or overindulgence.
    • 1699, [Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury], An Inquiry Concerning Virtue: In Two Discourses, [], London: Printed for A. Bell [...] E. Castle [...] and S. Buckley, OCLC 837888670; republished as “Treatise IV. Viz. An Inquiry Concerning Virtue, or Merit. []”, in Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times. In Three Volumes, volume II, [London: Printed by John Darby], 1711, OCLC 883651382, book II, part II, section II, pages 149–150:
      Tho the Impatience of abſtaining be greater; the Pleaſure of Indulgence is really leſs. The Palls or Nauseatings which continually intervene, are of the worſt and moſt hateful kind of Senſation. Hardly is there any thing taſted which is wholly free from this ill reliſh of a ſurfeited Senſe and ruin'd Appetite.

References[edit]

  1. ^ pal, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 19 January 2019; “pall, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2005.
  2. 2.0 2.1 pall” (US) / “pall” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ pall, v.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2005.
  4. ^ pall, v.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2005.
  5. ^ pallen, v.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 19 January 2019.
  6. ^ apallen, v.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 19 January 2019.
  7. ^ † pall, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2005.

Further reading[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *palei-, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pel- 'to speak with a loud voice'. Cognate to Gothic 𐍃𐍀𐌹𐌻𐌻𐍉𐌽 (spillōn, to proclaim)[1].

Verb[edit]

pall (first-person singular past tense palla, participle pallë/pallur)

  1. To cry, hee-haw.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.365

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From either German Ball or Middle Low German bal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pall (genitive palli, partitive palli)

  1. (sports) ball

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Livonian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Akin to Estonian paluma.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pall

  1. ask

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *paladak.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pall

  1. burn

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse pallr

Noun[edit]

pall m (definite singular pallen, indefinite plural paller, definite plural pallene)

  1. a pallet (portable platform on which goods are stacked for transport)
  2. a podium (especially for winners of a sporting event)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse pallr

Noun[edit]

pall m (definite singular pallen, indefinite plural pallar, definite plural pallane)

  1. a pallet (portable platform on which goods are stacked for transport)
  2. a podium (especially for winners of a sporting event)

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

pall[4] = pawl (2)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pall c

  1. a stool; a chair without armrests or a back
  2. (sports) a podium for prize ceremonies
  3. a pallet; a movable platform, constructed to be moved by forklifts
  4. a pawl (a pin in a ratchet gear)
    att stå pall
    to cope, to stand against pressure
  5. (dated, slang) an apple

Declension[edit]

Declension of pall 1-4
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pall pallen pallar pallarna
Genitive palls pallens pallars pallarnas
Declension of pall 5
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pall pallet pall pallen
Genitive palls pallets palls pallens

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

pall m (plural pallon)

  1. tent

Synonyms[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse pallr, of uncertain origin.

Noun[edit]

pall m

  1. Floor in stall or box.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]