palliate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin palliatus (cloaked) (in Late Latin the past participle of palliare (to cover with a cloak)), from pallium (cloak).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (verb) IPA(key): /ˈpælieɪt/
    • (file)
    • Rhymes: -ælieɪt
  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ˈpæliət/

Verb[edit]

palliate (third-person singular simple present palliates, present participle palliating, simple past and past participle palliated)

  1. To relieve the symptoms of; to ameliorate. [from 15th c.]
    • 2009, Boris Johnson, The Evening Standard, 15 Jan 09:
      And if there are some bankers out there who are still embarrassed by the size of their bonuses, then I propose that they palliate their guilt by giving to the Mayor's Fund for London to help deprived children in London.
  2. (obsolete) To hide or disguise. [16th–19th c.]
  3. To cover or disguise the seriousness of (a mistake, offence etc.) by excuses and apologies. [from 17th c.]
    • April 5 1628, Bishop Joseph Hall, The Blessings, Sins, and Judgments of God's Vineyard
      We extenuate not our guilt : whatever we sin , we condemn it as mortal : they palliate wickedness , with the fair pretence of veniality
  4. (obsolete) To lessen the severity of; to extenuate, moderate, qualify. [17th–18th c.]
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Francesca Carrara. [], volume III, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), OCLC 630079698, page 300:
      "Ah, dearest!" replied he, "your spirits are exhausted,—perhaps unconsciously oppressed with the idea of that future whose pain and whose peril I have rather heightened than palliated."
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 18, [1]
      If, mindless of palliating circumstances, we are bound to regard the death of the Master-at-arms as the prisoner's deed, then does that deed constitute a capital crime whereof the penalty is a mortal one?
  5. To placate or mollify. [from 17th c.]
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1962, OCLC 751607287, page 65:
      Bradly stopped dead, too confounded to be appalled. Young Podson! Impossible! He had last seen young Podson, a bank clerk, on the seat of a pub verandah in an inland town ninety miles away, Bradly's last painting town. A noosance, young Podson, only to be palliated on a pub verandah after dinner.
    • 2007, "Looking towards a Brown future", The Guardian, 25 Jan 07:
      Brown's options for the machinery of Whitehall are constrained, as for all prime ministers, by the need to palliate allies and hug enemies close (John Reid, say).

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

palliate (comparative more palliate, superlative most palliate)

  1. (obsolete) Cloaked; hidden, concealed. [15th–17th c.]
  2. (obsolete) Eased; mitigated; alleviated.
    • 1661, John Fell, The life of the most learned, reverend, and pious Dr. H. Hammond
      [the] most helpful method of its Cure, which yet if palliate and imperfect would onely make way to more fatal Sickness

References[edit]

  • Paternoster, Lewis M. and Frager-Stone, Ruth. Three Dimensions of Vocabulary Growth. Second Edition. Amsco School Publications: USA. 1998.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /palˈlja.te/
  • Rhymes: -ate
  • Hyphenation: pal‧lià‧te

Participle[edit]

palliate

  1. feminine plural of palliato

Adjective[edit]

palliate

  1. feminine plural of palliato

Noun[edit]

palliate f

  1. plural of palliata

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

palliāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of palliātus

References[edit]