pallium

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English[edit]

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a liturgical pallium

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pallium (a cloak). Doublet of pall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pallium (plural pallia or palliums)

  1. (historical) A large cloak worn by Greek philosophers and teachers. [from 10th c.]
  2. (Christianity) A woolen liturgical vestment resembling a collar and worn over the chasuble in the Western Christian liturgical tradition, conferred on archbishops by the Pope, equivalent to the Eastern Christian omophorion. [from 11th c.]
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 339:
      Gregory sent Augustine a special liturgical stole, the pallium, a piece of official ecclesiastical dress borrowed from the garments worn by imperial officials.
    • 2016, Peter H. Wilson, The Holy Roman Empire, Penguin 2017, p. 23:
      Wynfrith, an Anglo-Saxon monk later known as St Boniface, who was the first archbishop of Mainz and a key figure in the Empire's church history, was given cloth that had lain across St Peter's tomb as his pallium in 752.
  3. (zoology) The mantle of a mollusc. [from 19th c.]
  4. (anatomy) The cerebral cortex. [from 19th c.]
  5. (obsolete, meteorology) A sheet of cloud covering the whole sky, especially nimbostratus. [19th c.]

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to palla (cloak, robe), which is possibly from the root of pellis (skin).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pallium n (genitive palliī); second declension

  1. cloak
  2. coverlet

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pallium pallia
Genitive palliī palliōrum
Dative palliō palliīs
Accusative pallium pallia
Ablative palliō palliīs
Vocative pallium pallia

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