Hercules

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See also: hercules, Hércules, and Hèrcules

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin Herculēs, from Ancient Greek Ἡρακλῆς (Hēraklês), apparently from Ἥρα (Hḗra, Hera) + κλέος (kléos, glory).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Hercules

  1. (Roman mythology) The Roman name for the Greek divine hero Heracles, who was the son of Jupiter and Alcmene, a celebrated hero who possessed exceptional strength. Most famous for his 12 labours performed to redeem himself after killing his family.
  2. (astronomy) A summer constellation of the northern sky, said to resemble the mythical hero. It lies between the constellations Lyra and Corona Borealis.
  3. (astronomy) A crater in the first quadrant on the moon.
  4. A city in California.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Hercules m

  1. (astronomy) Hercules

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Via the Etruscan [script needed] (HERCLE), from the Ancient Greek Ἡρακλῆς (Hēraklês), apparently from Ἥρα (Hḗra, Hera) + κλέος (kléos, glory).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Herculēs m (variously declined, genitive Herculis or Herculī or Herculeī); third declension, fifth declension

  1. (Greek mythology) Hercules, Heracles, heroic son of Zeus.
    Ne Hercules quidem adversus duos.
    Not even Hercules fights against two.

Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

Fifth- and third-declension forms occur;
Greek influence is often apparent in the vocative.

Number Singular
nominative Herculēs
genitive Herculeī
Herculī
Herculis
dative Herculeī
Herculī
accusative Herculem
ablative Herculē̆
vocative Herculē̆s
Hercule
  • The genitive Herculeī appears in Catull's carmina 55 (but depends on the edition as it's also Herculi: "sed/Sed te iam/jam ferre Herculei labos est" or "sed/Sed te iam ferre Herculi labos est").
  • The datives Herculeī and Hercoleī appear in inscriptions.[1]
  • There is the genitive plural Herculum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Corpus inscriptorum Latinarum vol. I pars II fasc. I, p.623 §1482 [= 1113] and p.626 §1503 [= 1145]. More properly: Theodorus Mommsen (editor), Inscriptiones latinae antiquissimae ad C. Caesaris mortem. Editio altera, fasciculus I, Berlin, 1918