Ball

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: ball, bal, bál, bål, and Bäll

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Multiple theories and origins.

Proper noun[edit]

Ball

  1. An English surname​.
  2. A town in Rapides Parish, Louisiana, United States.
  3. A hamlet in Egloshayle parish, on the eastern outskirts of Wadebridge, Cornwall, England (OS grid ref SX0073).

Derived terms[edit]


Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German bal, from Proto-Germanic *balluz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Ball m (plural Balle or Bäll, diminutive Bällche)

  1. (most dialects) ball (round or roundish object, most commonly used in games)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French bal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Ball f or m (plural Balls)

  1. (most dialects, dance) ball (social gathering for dancing), prom (US)
Usage notes[edit]
  • The plural, Balls, is only used in western Ripuarian and the Limburgan-Ripuarian Transitional Dialects. The other dialects do not have a (known) plural. There is also no known diminutive.
  • The feminine form is used in westernmost Ripuarian and the Limburgan-Ripuarian Transitional Dialects, the masculine form is used in most other dialects.

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bal/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -al

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German bal, from Proto-Germanic *balluz.

Noun[edit]

Ball m (strong, genitive Balles or Balls, plural Bälle, diminutive Bällchen n)

  1. ball (round or roundish object, most commonly used in games)
  2. ball (a formal dance)
  3. bullet
Usage notes[edit]

The German words Kugel and Ball are usually distinguished inasmuch as the former refers to solid balls (such as those used for billiards or bowling) while the latter refers to air-filled or elastic balls (such as tennis or footballs/soccer balls). This distinction may be neglected colloquially or jokingly.

Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]
round object
formal dance

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French bal.

Noun[edit]

Ball m

  1. (dance) ball (social gathering for dancing), prom (US)
    Synonym: (dance) Tanzball m
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German bal, from Proto-Germanic *balluz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Ball m (plural Bäll)

  1. ball (round object for playing sports)