alp

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See also: ālp-, Alp, and ALP

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from alps pl, from Latin alpes (high mountains, especially those of Switzerland), of Celtic or Germanic origin (compare Old Saxon elbon (Alps), Old High German Alpūn (Alps); Old High German alba (alp, mountain)), probably from Proto-Indo-European *albʰós (white).

Noun[edit]

alp (plural alps)

  1. A very high mountain. Specifically, one of the Alps, the highest chain of mountains in Europe.
    • (Can we date this quote by Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Nor breath of vernal air from snowy alp.
    • (Can we date this quote by Alexander Pope and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Hills peep o'er hills, and alps on alps arise.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • Alp (superseded)

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from Alpen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɑlp/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: alp
  • Rhymes: -ɑlp

Noun[edit]

alp m (plural alpen, diminutive alpje n)

  1. alp, (very) high mountain

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Phrase[edit]

alp

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) à la prochaine

Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare English alp.

Noun[edit]

alp m (genitive singular ailp, nominative plural alpa)

  1. alp (high mountain)
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

alp (present analytic alpann, future analytic alpfaidh, verbal noun alpadh, past participle alptha)

  1. (transitive) devour, swallow whole
  2. (transitive) grab
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • alpach, alpúil (voracious, greedy; grabbing, adjective)
  • alpaire m (voracious eater; grabber)
Related terms[edit]
  • alpaireacht f ((act of) bolting food; voracious eating; (act of) grabbing)
  • alpartha (greedy; stout, burly, adjective)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

alp f (genitive singular ailpe, nominative plural ailpeanna)

  1. Alternative form of ailp (lump, chunk; knob)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

alp m (genitive singular ailp, nominative plural alpa)

  1. Alternative form of earc (lizard; reptile)
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
alp n-alp halp t-alp
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Middle High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (elf, spirit): alb

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German alp (13th century), from Proto-Germanic *albiz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *albʰós.

Noun[edit]

alp m (plural elbe or elber)

  1. elf
  2. friendly spirit, ghostly being, genius, or fairy
  3. nightmare (later meaning)

Descendants[edit]

  • German: Alb

References[edit]

  • Marshall Jones Company (1930). Mythology of All Races Series, Volume 2 Eddic, Great Britain: Marshall Jones Company, 1930, pp. 220.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from Old Irish alp (lump, loose mass).

Noun[edit]

alp f (genitive singular ailp, plural alpa)

  1. protuberance, eminence
  2. mountain

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
alp n-alp h-alp t-alp
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

alp c

  1. alp; a mountain in the Alps

Declension[edit]

Declension of alp 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative alp alpen alper alperna
Genitive alps alpens alpers alpernas

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *ălp (difficult, hard; warrior, hero, brave; giant, landlord).[1] Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰞𐰯(alp).

Adjective[edit]

alp (comparative daha alp, superlative en alp)

  1. brave, hero

References[edit]

  1. ^ Starostin, Sergei; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg (2003), “*ălpa”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8), Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill