elf

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See also: Elf and ELF

English[edit]

An elf drawn by Piedachu Peris

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English elf, elfe, from Old English ælf (incubus, elf), from Proto-Germanic *albiz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂elbʰós (white).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf (plural elves)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. (Norse mythology) A luminous spirit presiding over nature and fertility and dwelling in the world of Álfheim (Elfland). Compare angel, nymph, fairy.
    • Shakespeare
      Every elf, and fairy sprite, / Hop as light as bird from brier.
  2. Any from a race of mythical, supernatural beings resembling but seen as distinct from human beings. They are usually delicate-featured and skilled in magic or spellcrafting; sometimes depicted as clashing with dwarves, especially in modern fantasy literature.
  3. (fantasy) Any of the magical, typically forest-guarding races bearing some similarities to the Norse álfar (through Tolkien's Eldar).
  4. A very diminutive person; a dwarf.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (supernatural creature): See goblin (hostile); fairy (small, mischievous)

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

elf (third-person singular simple present elfs, present participle elfing, simple past and past participle elfed)

  1. (now rare) To twist into elflocks (of hair); to mat.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear
      My face I'll grime with filth, blanket my loins, elf all my hairs in knots, and with presented nakedness outface the winds and persecutions of the sky.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Marshall Jones Company (1930). Mythology of All Races Series, Volume 2 Eddic, Great Britain: Marshall Jones Company, 1930, pp. 220-221.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Afrikaans cardinal numbers
 <  10 11 12  > 
    Cardinal : elf
    Ordinal : elfde

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch elf, from Middle Dutch ellef, elf, from Old Dutch *ellef, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf m (plural elfs)

  1. elf

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf m

  1. elf

Declension[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch ellef, elf, from Old Dutch *ellef, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif, a compound of *ainaz and *-lif. Compare German elf, West Frisian alve, English eleven, Danish elleve.

Numeral[edit]

Dutch cardinal numbers
 <  10 11 12  > 
    Cardinal : elf
    Ordinal : elfde

elf

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Noun[edit]

elf f (plural elven, diminutive elfje n)

  1. The number eleven, or a representation thereof.
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from German Elf, itself borrowed from English elf, from Old English ælf, from Proto-Germanic *albiz. Displaced native alf, from the same Germanic source.

Noun[edit]

elf m (plural elfen, diminutive elfje n, feminine elve)

  1. elf (mythical creature)
  2. brownie
Synonyms[edit]
  • (mythical being): alf

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately cognate to German elf.

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. eleven (11)

German[edit]

German cardinal numbers
 <  10 11 12  > 
    Cardinal : elf
    Ordinal : elfte

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German einlif, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif, a compound of *ainaz and *-lif. Compare Dutch elf, West Frisian alve, English eleven, Danish elleve.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • elf in Duden online

German Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German elvene, from Old Saxon ellevan.

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. eleven

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic أَلْف (ʾalf).

Numeral[edit]

elf m, f (pl elef)

  1. thousand

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English elf, Anglian form of ælf, from Proto-Germanic *albiz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂elbʰós (white).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf (plural elves)

  1. elf, fairy
  2. spirit, shade

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German elf, Dutch elf, English eleven.

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf m anim (plural elfy)

  1. elf, mythical or fantasy creature

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Usage notes[edit]

The plural for the Tolkien creatures is usually elfowie.