elf

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See also: Elf and ELF

English[edit]

An elf drawn by Piedachu Peris

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English ælf (incubus, elf), from Proto-Germanic *albiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf (plural elves)

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Wikipedia

  1. (Norse mythology) A luminous spirit presiding over nature and fertility and dwelling in the world of Álfheim (Elfland). Compare angel, nymph, fairy.
    • Shakespeare
      Every elf, and fairy sprite, / Hop as light as bird from brier.
  2. Any from a race of mythical, supernatural beings resembling but seen as distinct from human beings. Usually skilled in magic or spellcrafting; sometimes depicted as clashing with dwarves, especially in modern fantasy literature.
  3. (fantasy) Any of the magical, typically forest-guarding races bearing some similarities to the Norse álfar (through Tolkien's Eldar)
  4. A very diminutive person; a dwarf.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Marshall Jones Company (1930). Mythology of All Races Series, Volume 2 Eddic, Great Britain: Marshall Jones Company, 1930, pp. 220-221.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Afrikaans cardinal numbers
 <  10 11 12  > 
    Cardinal : elf
    Ordinal : elfde

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch elf, from Middle Dutch ellef, elf, from Old Dutch *ellef, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif.

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf m (plural elfs)

  1. elf

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf m

  1. An elf.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch ellef, elf, from Old Dutch *ellef, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif, a compound of *ainaz and *lif-. Compare German elf, West Frisian alve, English eleven, Danish elleve.

Numeral[edit]

Dutch cardinal numbers
 <  10 11 12  > 
    Cardinal : elf
    Ordinal : elfde

elf

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Noun[edit]

elf m, f (plural elven, diminutive elfje n)

  1. The number eleven, or a representation thereof.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from German Elf, borrowed from English elf, from Old English ælf, from Proto-Germanic *albiz. Displaced native alf, from the same Germanic source.

Noun[edit]

elf m, f (plural elfen, diminutive elfje n)

  1. elf (mythical creature)
  2. brownie

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately cognate to German elf.

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. eleven (11)

German[edit]

German cardinal numbers
 <  10 11 12  > 
    Cardinal : elf
    Ordinal : elfte
See also Elf

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German einlif, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif, a compound of *ainaz and *lif-. Compare Dutch elf, West Frisian alve, English eleven, Danish elleve.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. (cardinal) eleven

Coordinate terms[edit]


German Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately cognate to German elf.

Numeral[edit]

elf

  1. eleven (11)

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic أَلْف ('alf).

Numeral[edit]

elf m, f (pl elef)

  1. thousand

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

elf m (plural elfy)

  1. elf, mythical or fantasy creature

Usage notes[edit]

The plural for the Tolkien creatures is usually elfowie.