brave

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See also: bravé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French brave, borrowed from Italian bravo, itself either from Provençal brau (show-off), from Gaulish *bragos (compare Middle Irish breagha (modern breá) 'fine', Breton braga 'to strut') or from Latin *bravus, from a fusion of pravus and barbarus into a root *bravus. Or else misread from Latin brana,[1] from Gaulish brahaigne, "barren".[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brave (comparative braver, superlative bravest)

  1. Strong in the face of fear; courageous.
  2. (obsolete) Having any sort of superiority or excellence.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      Iron is a brave commodity where wood aboundeth.
    • Samuel Pepys (1633-1703)
      It being a brave day, I walked to Whitehall.
  3. Making a fine show or display.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      Wear my dagger with the braver grace.
    • Robert Greene (1558-1592)
      For I have gold, and therefore will be brave. / In silks I'll rattle it of every color.
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
      Frog and lizard in holiday coats / And turtle brave in his golden spots.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 29686887 , chapter IV:
      So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

brave (plural braves)

  1. (dated, possibly offensive) A Native American warrior.
  2. (obsolete) A man daring beyond discretion; a bully.
    • John Dryden
      Hot braves like thee may fight.
  3. (obsolete) A challenge; a defiance; bravado.
    • William Shakespeare
      Demetrius, thou dost overween in all; / And so in this, to bear me down with braves.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

brave (third-person singular simple present braves, present participle braving, simple past and past participle braved)

  1. (transitive) To encounter with courage and fortitude, to defy.
    • (Can we date this quote?), John Dryden
      These I can brave, but those I can not bear.
    • 1773, A Farmer, Rivington's New-York Gazetteer, Number 53, December 2
      [] but they [Parliament] never will be braved into it.
    After braving tricks on the high-dive, he braved a jump off the first diving platform.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To adorn; to make fine or showy.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Shakespeare
      Thou [a tailor whom Grunio was browbeating] hast braved many men; brave not me; I'll neither be faced or braved.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

brava +‎ -e

Adverb[edit]

brave

  1. bravely, valiantly

Etymology 2[edit]

From Italian bravo.

Interjection[edit]

brave

  1. bravo

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably borrowed from Italian bravo, itself from a Latin *bravus, a fusion of prāvus and barbarus. Compare Spanish, Portuguese bravo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brave (plural braves)

  1. brave
  2. honest

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

brave m (plural braves)

  1. hero

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brave

  1. inflected form of brav

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brave f pl

  1. feminine plural of bravo

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin *bravus.

Adjective[edit]

brave m, f

  1. brave

Derived terms[edit]