glew

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English[edit]

Noun[edit]

glew (countable and uncountable, plural glews)

  1. Obsolete form of glue.
    • 1764, Edmund Burke, Dodsley's annual register: Volume 1758, Part 1 (page 385)
      When the painting is originally on wood, it must be first detached from the ceiling or wainscot where it was fixed; and the surface of it covered with a linen cloth, cemented to it by means of glew []

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for glew in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French glu, from Late Latin glūs, from Latin glūten, from Proto-Italic *gloiten.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

glew (plural glewes)

  1. A adhesive or adherent; something that binds:
    1. glue; a substance designed to adhere two things together.
    2. birdlime; a trap or capturing mechanism.
    3. A tar or resin; any natural adherent.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English glēaw.

Noun[edit]

glew

  1. Alternative form of gleu.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English glīwian.

Verb[edit]

glew

  1. Alternative form of glewen (to play music, have fun).

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old French gluer.

Verb[edit]

glew

  1. Alternative form of glewen (to glue).

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

glew (feminine singular glew, plural glew, equative glewed, comparative glewach, superlative glewaf)

  1. brave, bold

Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
glew lew nglew unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.