glow

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See also: głów

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English glowen, from Old English glōwan, from Proto-Germanic *glōaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰel-. Cognate with Saterland Frisian gloie, glöie, gluuje, West Frisian gloeie, Dutch gloeien, German glühen, Danish and Norwegian glo, Icelandic glóa. See also glass.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

glow (third-person singular simple present glows, present participle glowing, simple past glowed or (nonstandard) glew, past participle glowed or (nonstandard) glown)

  1. To emit light as if heated.
    The fire was still glowing after ten hours.
  2. (copulative) To radiate thermal heat.
    Iron glows red hot when heated to near its melting point.
    After their workout, the gymnasts' faces were glowing red.
  3. To display intense emotion.
    The zealots glowed with religious fervor.
    You are glowing from happiness!
  4. To gaze especially passionately at something.
  5. To shine brightly and steadily.
    The new baby's room glows with bright, loving colors.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter V, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
      Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.
  6. (transitive) To make hot; to flush.
  7. (intransitive) To feel hot; to have a burning sensation, as of the skin, from friction, exercise, etc.; to burn.
  8. (intransitive, Internet slang) To be related to or part of an (chiefly online) undercover sting operation, especially by American federal agencies.
    • 2018 August 26, anonymous, “Cryptographic crumpling: The encryption 'middle ground' for government surveillance”, in alt.privacy, Usenet[1]:
      If this post glows any brighter I'm going to need sunglasses. 😄🕶👌
  9. (Internet slang, alt-right) to expose someone to the authorities.
  10. (Internet slang, alt-right) to create a threatening online post that may involve violence, and look suspicious enough to attract a police investigation.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

glow (countable and uncountable, plural glows)

  1. The light given off by a glowing object.
    • 1935, Samuel Beckett, Watt:
      Thus all that Art and Con had to do, when the night was favourable, was to advance a little way along the avenue, until they reached the place whence the light, if it was burning, must be visible, as a glow, a feeble glow, in the air, and thence to go on, towards the back door, or to go back, towards the gate, as the case might be.
    • 1994, Stephen Fry, chapter 2, in The Hippopotamus:
      The door of the twins' room opposite was open; a twenty-watt night-light threw a weak yellow glow into the passageway. David could hear the twins breathing in time with each other.
  2. The condition of being passionate or having warm feelings.
  3. The brilliance or warmth of color in an environment or on a person (especially one's face).
    He had a bright red glow on his face.

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from glow (noun)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English glīwian.

Verb[edit]

glow

  1. Alternative form of glewen (to play music, have fun).

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French gluer.

Verb[edit]

glow

  1. Alternative form of glewen (to glue).