gluten

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See also: Gluten and glúten

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From French gluten, borrowed from Latin glūten (glue).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gluten (countable and uncountable, plural glutens)

  1. (obsolete) Fibrin (formerly considered as one of the "animal humours"). [16th-19th c.]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069:, Bk.I, New York, 2001, p.147:
      The radical or innate is daily supplied by nourishment, which some call cambium, and make those secondary humours of ros and gluten to maintain it […].
  2. (rare) Any gluey, sticky substance. [from 17th c.]
    • 1990, Camille Paglia, Sexual Personae:
      The tyrant machine is the female body, grinding and milling the pulp of matter, the gluten of human flesh.
  3. The major protein in cereal grains, especially wheat; responsible for the elasticity in dough and the structure in baked bread. [from 19th c.]
    • 2010, Felicity Cloake, Word of Mouth Blog, The Guardian, 10 Jun 2010:
      Unfortunately, wholemeal bread is, according to many experts, a tricky thing to get right, as the lower gluten content of the flour makes for dense results [...].
  4. (geology) A gluey, sticky mass of clay, bitumen etc. [from 19th c.]
    • 1988, James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom, Oxford 2004, p. 669:
      Despite constant rain that turned roads to gluten, the Yankees kept moving.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: glu‧ten

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin gluten (glue).

Noun[edit]

gluten n (uncountable)

  1. gluten

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin gluten (glue).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gluten m (plural glutens)

  1. gluten

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *gloiten, from Proto-Indo-European *glóh₁ytn̥, from *gleh₁y- (to stick; to spread, to smear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

glūten n (genitive glūtinis); third declension

  1. glue

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative glūten glūtina
genitive glūtinis glūtinum
dative glūtinī glūtinibus
accusative glūten glūtina
ablative glūtine glūtinibus
vocative glūten glūtina

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • gluten in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gluten in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “gluten”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • gluten” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • glue in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin gluten (glue).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gluten m (plural glutenes)

  1. (biochemistry) gluten

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin gluten (glue).

Noun[edit]

gluten n

  1. gluten