mus

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See also: Mus, mūs, and mús

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus

  1. plural of mu

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier mux, from French mouche (fly).

Noun[edit]

mus

  1. (card games) A traditional Basque card game.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /muːs/, [muːˀs]

Noun[edit]

mus c (singular definite musen, plural indefinite mus)

  1. mouse (animal)
  2. mouse (for a computer)

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch mussche, from Old Dutch musca, from Latin muscio, derived from musca (fly). Cognate with Limburgish mösj, Central Franconian Mösch, Mesch, Luxembourgish Mësch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus f, m (plural mussen, diminutive musje n)

  1. sparrow

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

mus

  1. first-person singular past historic of mouvoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of mouvoir

Participle[edit]

mus

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of mouvoir

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s. Cognates include Ancient Greek μῦς (mûs), Sanskrit मूष् (mūṣ), Old English mūs (English mouse), Proto-Slavic *myšь (Russian мышь (myšʹ)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mūs m, f (genitive mūris); third declension

  1. mouse, rat

Inflection[edit]

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mūs mūrēs
genitive mūris mūrium
dative mūrī mūribus
accusative mūrem mūrēs
ablative mūre mūribus
vocative mūs mūrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • mus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “mus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • mus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mus in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • mus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mùs

  1. (first-person plural) accusative form of mes.

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

mus

  1. rafsi of muslo.

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mus

  1. locative of mun

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus m, f (definite singular musa or musen, indefinite plural mus, definite plural musene)

  1. a mouse (rodent)
  2. a mouse (computing)
  3. (slang) the female genitalia

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus f (definite singular musa, indefinite plural mus or myser, definite plural musene or mysene)

  1. a mouse (rodent)
  2. a mouse (computing)
  3. (slang) the female genitalia

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Verb[edit]

mus

  1. (auxiliary) have to, must

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mūs f

  1. mouse

Declension[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mūs f

  1. mouse

Declension[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs.

Noun[edit]

mūs f

  1. mouse

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) card game that is very popular in Spain

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish mūs, from Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s (mouse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus c

  1. mouse; small rodent of the genus Mus; especially species Mus musculus
  2. (computing) a computer mouse; an input device
  3. (colloquial) a pussy; female genitalia

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

animal
computers

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Unami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Algonquian *mo·swa.

Noun[edit]

mus anim

Pronunciation[edit]

  1. elk, moose

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús from the Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *mūs-.

Noun[edit]

mus f (definite singular musa, plural mösser or myster, definite plural mössren or mystren)

  1. (rodent) a mouse

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]