mus

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

mus

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Muscogee.

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus

  1. plural of mu

Anagrams[edit]

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch muts, from Middle Dutch mutse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus (plural musse)

  1. soft brimless hat, tuque

Basque[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier mux, probably from French mouche (fly).[1] However, compare musu (kiss).[2][3]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

mus inan

  1. (card games) A traditional Basque card game.

References[edit]

  1. ^ mus”, in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014
  2. ^ casino.es
  3. ^ Larramendi, Manuel (1754): Corografía de Guipuzcoa

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

The computing sense is a semantic loan from English mouse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus c (singular definite musen, plural indefinite mus)

  1. mouse (animal)
  2. mouse (for a computer)

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Een paar mussen op een geliefde voederplaats. — A couple of sparrows on a favourite foraging location.
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch mussche, from Old Dutch musca, from Latin muscio, derived from musca (fly).

Cognate with Limburgish mösj, Central Franconian Mösch, Mesch, Luxembourgish Mësch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus f (plural mussen, diminutive musje n)

  1. sparrow, bird of the family Passeridae, especially of the genus Passer and a few smaller genera

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: mossie
  • Papiamentu: mùs

Fala[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese nos, from Latin nōs (we; us).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mus

  1. (Lagarteiru) First person plural dative and accusative pronoun; us

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[1], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mus

  1. first/second-person singular past historic of mouvoir

Participle[edit]

mus m pl

  1. masculine plural of

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus (plural muses)

  1. mouse
    Synonym: mure

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *múh₂s. Cognates include Ancient Greek μῦς (mûs), Sanskrit मूष् (mū́ṣ), Old English mūs (English mouse), Old High German mūs (German Maus), Proto-Slavic *myšь (Russian мышь (myšʹ)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mūs m or f (genitive mūris); third declension

  1. a mouse, rat
    • Plaut. Pers. 1, 2, 6
      quasi mures semper edere alienum cibum
      Like mice they always ate the food of other people
  2. the sea mouse (Aphrodita aculeata)
  3. (New Latin) a computer mouse

Inflection[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mūs mūrēs
Genitive mūris mūrium
Dative mūrī mūribus
Accusative mūrem mūrēs
mūrīs
Ablative mūre mūribus
Vocative mūs mūrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Padanian:
    • Lombard: muson (shrew)
    • Piedmontese: musèt (shrew); muson (shrew, mole)
  • Northern Gallo-Romance:
    • Franco-Provençal: musèt (shrew)
  • Translingual: Mus

References[edit]

  • mus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • mus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mus in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • mus”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Anagrams[edit]

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mùs

  1. first-person plural accusative of mes

Maltese[edit]

Root
m-w-s
2 terms

Etymology[edit]

From Arabicمُوسًى(mūsan). Compare Moroccan Arabicموس(mūs), Libyan Arabicموس(mūs).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus m (plural mwies)

  1. pocket knife, folding knife, jack-knife, switchblade

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Maonan[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus

  1. pig

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mouche.

Noun[edit]

mus

  1. fly

References[edit]

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus

  1. Alternative form of mous

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈmuːs/

Pronoun[edit]

mūs

  1. locative of mun

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús.

The computing sense is a semantic loan from English mouse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus m or f (definite singular musen or musa, indefinite plural mus, definite plural musene)

  1. mouse (rodent)
  2. mouse (computing)
  3. (colloquial, vulgar, anatomy) pussy (female genitalia)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia nnWikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús (nominative and accusative plurals mýss), from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s. The computing sense is a semantic loan from English mouse, a coinage.

Germanic cognates include Icelandic mús, Faroese mús, Danish mus, Swedish mus, German Maus, German Low German Muus, Dutch muis, and English mouse. Indo-European cognates include Albanian mi, Ancient Greek μῦς (mûs), Armenian մուկ (muk), Hindi मूस (mūs), Latin mūs, Persianموش, and Russian мышь (myšʹ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus f (definite singular musa, indefinite plural myser or mus, definite plural mysene or musene)

  1. (rodent) a mouse
  2. (colloquial, vulgar, anatomy) pussy (female genitalia)
  3. (computing) computer mouse

Usage notes[edit]

  • This noun is often used in compounds as a first part to emphasize little size.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • “mus” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “mus”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016
  • “mus” in Ivar Aasen (1873) Norsk Ordbog med dansk Forklaring

Anagrams[edit]

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mūs f

  1. mouse
  2. muscle

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *múh₂s.

Noun[edit]

mūs f

  1. mouse

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mūs f

  1. mouse

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: mûs

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs.

Noun[edit]

mūs f

  1. mouse

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Deverbal from musieć.

Noun[edit]

mus m inan

  1. constraint, coercion, must
    Synonym: przymus
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from German Mousse, from French mousse.

Noun[edit]

mus m inan

  1. mousse
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mus in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • Wanda Decyk-Zięba, editor (2018-2022), “mus”, in Dydaktyczny Słownik Etymologiczno-historyczny Języka Polskiego [A Didactic, Historical, Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French mousse.

Noun[edit]

mus m (plural muși)

  1. cabin boy

Declension[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Basque mus.[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmus/ [ˈmus]
  • Rhymes: -us
  • Syllabification: mus

Noun[edit]

mus m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) a card game that is very popular in Spain

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.casino.es/mus/historia-mus/
  2. ^ Larramendi, Manuel (1754): Corografía de Guipuzcoa

Further reading[edit]

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English must.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mus

  1. (auxiliary) to have to, must

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish mūs, from Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s (mouse).

The computing sense is a semantic loan from English mouse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus c

  1. mouse; small rodent of the genus Mus; especially species Mus musculus
  2. (computing) a computer mouse; an input device
  3. (colloquial) a pussy; female genitalia

Declension[edit]

Declension of mus 1, 2
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mus musen möss mössen
Genitive mus musens möss mössens
Declension of mus 3
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mus musen musar musarna
Genitive mus musens musars musarnas

Synonyms[edit]

female genitalia

Related terms[edit]

animal
computers

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Unami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Algonquian *mo·swa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus anim (plural musàk)

  1. elk, moose

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mus

  1. (Chipilo) donkey

White Hmong[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Hmong *n-mʉŋᴮ (to go), from Proto-Hmong-Mien *n-mʉŋ(X) (id).[1] Cognate with Proto-Mien *n-mɨŋᴬ (id), whence Iu Mien mingh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mus

  1. to go

Interjection[edit]

mus

  1. shoo!

References[edit]

  • Heimbach, Ernest E. (1979) White Hmong — English Dictionary[3], SEAP Publications, →ISBN.
  1. ^ Ratliff, Martha (2010) Hmong-Mien language history (Studies in Language Change; 8), Camberra, Australia: Pacific Linguistics, →ISBN, pages 30; 276.