shoo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare Dutch schuwen (to shun), German scheuchen (to scare, drive away).

Verb[edit]

shoo (third-person singular simple present shoos, present participle shooing, simple past and past participle shooed)

  1. (transitive, informal) To induce someone or something to leave.
    Don't just shoo away mosquitoes, kill them!
    See if you can shoo off the insurance salesmen.
  2. (intransitive, informal) To leave under inducement.
    You kids had better shoo before your parents get a call.
  3. (informal, rare) To usher someone.
    Shoo the visitor in.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

shoo!

  1. (informal, demeaning) Go away! Clear off!
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:go away
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

shoo

  1. (Yorkshire) Alternative form of she

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

shoo

  1. Alternative form of sho (shoe)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

shoo

  1. Alternative form of shon (to shoe)

Navajo[edit]

Interjection[edit]

shoo

  1. I see; oh yes, I see

Derived terms[edit]


Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English show.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

shoo (n class, plural shoo)

  1. show (performance)

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English shoe, from Old English hēo, hīo, from Proto-West Germanic *hiju.

Proper noun[edit]

shoo

  1. she

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 67