lus

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus

  1. plural of lu

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lawH-.

Noun[edit]

lus c (singular definite lusen, plural indefinite lus)

  1. louse

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus f (plural lussen, diminutive lusje n)

  1. loop

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lus

  1. first-person singular past historic of lire
  2. second-person singular past historic of lire

Participle[edit]

lus

  1. masculine past participle of lire

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus m (genitive singular lusa, nominative plural lusanna)

  1. plant, herb

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • "lus" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 lus” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

lus

  1. rafsi of lunsa.

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

Noun[edit]

lus m (genitive singular lus, plural lussyn)

  1. plant, herb
  2. leek
  3. vervain

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1 lus” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

Noun[edit]

lus m, f (definite singular lusa or lusen, indefinite plural lus, definite plural lusene)

  1. a louse (plural lice)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

Noun[edit]

lus f (definite singular lusa, indefinite plural lus or lyser, definite plural lusene or lysene)

  1. a louse (plural lice)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lus

  1. they (all sexless objects); them (all sexless objects)

Related terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lūs. Compare Old High German lūs, Old Norse lús.

Noun[edit]

lūs f (nominative plural lȳs)

  1. louse

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus m (oblique plural lus, nominative singular lus, nominative plural lus)

  1. pike (fish)

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus m

  1. plant, herb, vegetable
  2. leek

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lus
also llus after a proclitic
lus
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
lus
also llus after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • 1 lus” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs.

Noun[edit]

lūs f

  1. louse

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

Noun[edit]

lus m (genitive singular luis or lusa, plural lusan)

  1. plant, herb
  2. weed

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • 1 lus” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish lūs, from Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus c

  1. louse

Declension[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lawH-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus f (definite singular lusa, plural lyss)

  1. louse

Derived terms[edit]