lus

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See also: lús and Łuś

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

lus

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of lu

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus

  1. plural of lu

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • lut (Standard Albanian)

Etymology[edit]

Variant of lut.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lus/, [lʊs] (Standard)
  • IPA(key): /ʎut/, /ʎʊs/ (Gheg)

Verb[edit]

lus (first-person singular past tense luta, participle lutur)

  1. (active, transitive) I request, (kindly) ask for; I plead, I beg

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • [1] active verb lut, lus (aorist luta; participle lutur) • Fjalor Shqip

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lewH-.

Noun[edit]

lus c (singular definite lusen, plural indefinite lus)

  1. louse

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch litse, from Old French lice, from Vulgar Latin līcia, from Latin līcium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lus
  • Rhymes: -ʏs

Noun[edit]

lus f (plural lussen, diminutive lusje n)

  1. loop

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lus

  1. first/second-person singular past historic of lire

Participle[edit]

lus

  1. masculine past participle of lire

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus m (genitive singular lusa, nominative plural lusanna)

  1. plant, herb
    Synonym: luibh

Declension[edit]

  • Alternative genitive singular/nominative plural form: losa

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Entries containing “lus” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “lus” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

References[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese luz

Noun[edit]

lus

  1. light, lamp

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

Noun[edit]

lus m (genitive singular lus, plural lussyn)

  1. plant, herb
  2. leek
  3. vervain

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

Noun[edit]

lus m or f (definite singular lusa or lusen, indefinite plural lus, definite plural lusene)

  1. a louse (plural lice)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
lus på kufte
stitches in a knitted pattern
lus i nype
hairy seeds in a rosehip

Alternative forms[edit]

  • Lus (obsolete capitalization)[1]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

Germanic cognates include Icelandic and Faroese lús, Danish and Swedish lus, German Laus, Dutch luis, and English louse. Wider Indo-European cognates may include some in Brythonic languages, such as Welsh llau and Breton laou.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus f (definite singular lusa, indefinite plural lus or lyser, definite plural lusene or lysene)

  1. (entomology) a louse (a small blood-sucking insect in the order Siphunculata)
  2. (entomology) a small insect that is either closely related or similar in behaviour or appearance to a true louse
  3. a miser; a stingy and miserly person
  4. (knitting) a single stitch of a different colour compared to the surrounding fabric, often to form a knitted pattern
  5. (botany, colloquial) a hairy seed from a rosehip
  6. (carpentry, woodworking) a piece of wood made to fill a gap that is left open, typically as a mistake during the moulding
  7. (computing) a computer bug
  8. (nautical, cartography) a symbol (a cross with four dots) signifying a rock awash
  9. (colloquial, rare) a crayon

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

  • mus f (mouse) (for its morphological similarities)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cf. Ivar Aasen (1850) , “Lus”, in Ordbog over det norske Folkesprog, Oslo: Samlaget, published 2000

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *lūs. Compare Old High German lūs, Old Norse lús.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lūs f (nominative plural lȳs)

  1. louse

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: lous, lows, lowse

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lucius (pike)

Noun[edit]

lus m (oblique plural lus, nominative singular lus, nominative plural lus)

  1. pike (fish)

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *lussus (medicinal herb, vegetable), likely influenced by Proto-Celtic *lubā (herb, plant), from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (leaf).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus m

  1. plant, herb, vegetable
  2. leek

Inflection[edit]

Masculine u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lus lusL losae
Vocative lus lusL lusu
Accusative lusN lusL lusu
Genitive losoH, losaH loso, losa losaeN
Dative lusL losaib losaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lus
also llus after a proclitic
lus
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs.

Noun[edit]

lūs f

  1. louse

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Papiamentu[edit]

Blender3D li schreibtischlampe.jpg

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese luz and Spanish luz and Kabuverdianu lus.

Noun[edit]

lus

  1. light, lamp

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

Noun[edit]

lus m (genitive singular luis or lusa, plural lusan)

  1. plant, herb
  2. weed

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • lus” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 lus”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish lūs, from Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus c

  1. louse

Declension[edit]

Declension of lus 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lus lusen löss lössen
Genitive lus lusens löss lössens

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lewH-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lus f (definite singular lusa, plural lyss, definite plural lystren)

  1. louse

Derived terms[edit]