mull

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Mull, múll, Müll, and müll

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /mʌl/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌl

Etymology 1[edit]

Related to mill (to grind).

Verb[edit]

mull (third-person singular simple present mulls, present participle mulling, simple past and past participle mulled)

  1. (usually with over) To work (over) mentally; to cogitate; to ruminate.
    to mull a thought or a problem
    he paused to mull over his various options before making a decision
    • 1912 October, Edgar Rice Burroughs, “Tarzan of the Apes”, in The All-Story, New York, N.Y.: Frank A. Munsey Co., OCLC 17392886; republished as chapter 5, in Tarzan of the Apes, New York, N.Y.: A. L. Burt Company, 1914, OCLC 1224185:
      It was the germ of a thought, which, however, was destined to mull around in his conscious and subconscious mind until it resulted in magnificent achievement.
    • 2021 February 2, Katharine Murphy, The Guardian[1]:
      When Morrison mulls the pluses and minuses associated with rebuking Kelly for undermining the government’s public health messaging, the prime minister faces a genuine substantive dilemma, and that goes to the risks of amplification.
  2. To powder; to pulverize.
  3. To chop marijuana so that it becomes a smokable form.
  4. To heat and spice something, such as wine.
  5. To join two or more individual windows at mullions.
  6. To dull or stupefy.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

mull (countable and uncountable, plural mulls)

  1. (uncountable) Marijuana that has been chopped to prepare it for smoking.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  2. A stew of meat, broth, milk, butter, vegetables, and seasonings, thickened with soda crackers.
  3. The gauze used in bookbinding to adhere a text block to a book's cover.
  4. An inferior kind of madder prepared from the smaller roots or the peelings and refuse of the larger.
  5. (slang, archaic) A mess of something; a mistake.
    • 1904, New Zealand. Parliament. House of Representatives, Parliamentary Debates (page 83)
      Mr. HERDMAN. — The honourable member for Nelson says they made a mull of it. If the honourable gentleman had been a financial authority he would never have given expression to such a thought.
    • 2014, Andrea Pickens, A Stroke of Luck
      After studying the page a bit longer, she made a face. "Good Lord, you've really made a mull of it. Here, let me have a closer look."
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from mulmul.

Noun[edit]

mull (countable and uncountable, plural mulls)

  1. A thin, soft muslin.
    • 1916, “Smocking”, in The Dressmaker: A Complete Book on All Matters Connected with Sewing and Dressmaking [], 2nd revised and enlarged edition, New York, N.Y.; London: The Butterick Publishing Company, OCLC 2883294, page 29:
      Smocking done in colors on fine white batiste, silk mull, or nainsook makes pretty guimpes and dresses for children and very smart blouses for women.
Descendants[edit]
  • German: Mull
  • Norwegian Bokmål: moll
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mull (plural mulls)

  1. (Scotland) A promontory.
    the Mull of Kintyre
  2. A snuffbox made of the small end of a horn.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English molle (rubbish), from Middle French mol or its etymon Latin mollis.

Noun[edit]

mull (uncountable)

  1. dirt; rubbish

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

mull

  1. Alternative form of molle (rubbish)

Scots[edit]

Noun[edit]

mull (plural mulls)

  1. headland

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mold, from Proto-Germanic *muldō (dirt, soil). Cognate with Icelandic mold, German Mull, Dutch moude and Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌻𐌳𐌰 (mulda).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mull c

  1. mould, earth, soil
    Synonym: mylla
  2. dust

Declension[edit]

Declension of mull 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative mull mullen
Genitive mulls mullens

References[edit]