moll

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See also: Moll and møll

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Moll, an archaic nickname for Mary (see also Molly).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • mole (Australian, girlfriend of surfie or bikie)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moll (plural molls)

  1. A female companion of a gangster, especially a former or current prostitute.
  2. A prostitute or woman with loose sexual morals.
  3. (Australia, New Zealand, slang, derogatory) Bitch, slut; an insulting epithet applied to a female.
  4. (Australia, New Zealand, slang) A girlfriend of a bikie.
    • 1979, Eric Reade, History and Heartburn: The Saga of Australian Film, 1896-1978, p.209:
      The bikies ‘molls’ included Susan Lloyd as Tart; Victoria Anoux as Flossie; and Rosalind Talamini as Sunshine.
    • 1995, Debra Adelaide, The Hotel Albatross, p.76:
      ‘Oh God!’ groans Julie who once was a bikie moll back in the early seventies. ‘Hope it′s no one I know.’ But the Machismos turn out to be based on a New Zealand gang, which assembled in Australia after her time.
    • 2009, Albert Moran, Errol Vieth, The A to Z of Australian and New Zealand Cinema, p.142:
      Gilling first appeared as the biker′s moll Vanessa in Stone (1974) and the beautiful, evil cabin attendant in Number 96 (1974).
  5. (Australia, New Zealand, slang) A girlfriend of a surfie; blends with pejorative sense.
  6. (slang) A female fan of extreme metal, grunge or hardcore punk, especially the girlfriend of a musician of those aforementioned genres.
Usage notes[edit]

(girlfriend of a surfie or bikie): Because Australian pronunciation merges the /ɒ/ and /əʊ/ phonemes before /l/ (both become [oʊl]), this word is very commonly spelt mole in Australia, probably by contamination with mole (sneaky person). Indeed, the Australian Oxford dictionary does not list the Australian meaning of the term under the headword moll, but only under mole, although it does recognise that mole in this sense is “probably” a mere “variant of moll”.

Synonyms[edit]
  • (surfie's girlfriend): chick

Etymology 2[edit]

German Moll, from Latin mollis (soft, tender, elegiac). Compare molle (flat (in music)).

Cognate with Norwegian Bokmål moll.

Adjective[edit]

moll (not comparable)

  1. (music, obsolete) minor; in the minor mode
    A moll, that is, A minor
Translations[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “moll” in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Catalan moyll, from Latin mollem, from earlier *molduis, from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥dus (soft, weak), from *mel- (soft, weak, tender). Compare Occitan mòl, French mou, Spanish muelle.

Adjective[edit]

moll (feminine molla, masculine plural molls, feminine plural molles)

  1. moist
  2. weak
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Catalan moyl, from Vulgar Latin *medullum, analogically derived from Latin medulla[1], and probably influenced by Etymology 1. Compare Occitan mesolh, Spanish meollo, Portuguese miolo. Doublet of molla and medul·la, which were, respectively, inherited and borrowed from Latin.

Noun[edit]

moll m (uncountable)

  1. marrow, as in bone marrow
  2. the soft part of a fruit

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin mullus (red mullet).

Noun[edit]

moll m (plural molls)

  1. several species of fish
    moll de fangMullus barbatus
    moll de rocaMullus surmuletus
    moll reialApogon imberbis

Etymology 4[edit]

From Latin moles.

Noun[edit]

moll m (plural molls)

  1. quay, jetty
  2. breakwater

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ moll”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2022

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmol]
  • Hyphenation: moll

Noun[edit]

moll n

  1. (music) minor

Declension[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Moll, from Latin mollis (soft).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moll (not comparable)

  1. (music) minor
    moll akkordminor chord

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative moll mollok
accusative mollt mollokat
dative mollnak molloknak
instrumental mollal mollokkal
causal-final mollért mollokért
translative mollá mollokká
terminative mollig mollokig
essive-formal mollként mollokként
essive-modal
inessive mollban mollokban
superessive mollon mollokon
adessive mollnál molloknál
illative mollba mollokba
sublative mollra mollokra
allative mollhoz mollokhoz
elative mollból mollokból
delative mollról mollokról
ablative molltól molloktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
mollé molloké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
molléi mollokéi

Noun[edit]

moll (plural mollok)

  1. (music) minor (scale or key)
    a-mollA minor

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative moll mollok
accusative mollt mollokat
dative mollnak molloknak
instrumental mollal mollokkal
causal-final mollért mollokért
translative mollá mollokká
terminative mollig mollokig
essive-formal mollként mollokként
essive-modal
inessive mollban mollokban
superessive mollon mollokon
adessive mollnál molloknál
illative mollba mollokba
sublative mollra mollokra
allative mollhoz mollokhoz
elative mollból mollokból
delative mollról mollokról
ablative molltól molloktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
mollé molloké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
molléi mollokéi
Possessive forms of moll
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. mollom molljaim
2nd person sing. mollod molljaid
3rd person sing. mollja molljai
1st person plural mollunk molljaink
2nd person plural mollotok molljaitok
3rd person plural molljuk molljaik

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words

References[edit]

  1. ^ moll in Tótfalusi, István. Magyar etimológiai nagyszótár (’Hungarian Comprehensive Dictionary of Etymology’). Budapest: Arcanum Adatbázis, 2001; Arcanum DVD Könyvtár →ISBN

Further reading[edit]

  • moll in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mollis (soft, mild).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moll m (genitive singular molls, nominative plural mollar)

  1. (music) minor (scale or key)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish moil (a mass, heap, pile), mul m (a globular mass, heap, lump).

Noun[edit]

moll m (genitive singular moill, nominative plural mollta)

  1. heap; large amount, large number

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
moll mholl not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Manx[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Irish mellaid (to deceive, beguile, seduce), a denominative verb from Old Irish meld (pleasant, delightful). Cognate with Irish meall and Scottish Gaelic meall.

Verb[edit]

moll (past voll, future independent mollee, verbal noun molley, past participle mollit)

  1. fool, baffle, foil, beguile, cajole, captivate, deceive, bluff, trick
    Mollee y molteyr oo my oddys eh.The deceiver will deceive you if he can.
  2. disappoint
    V'eh mollit nagh daink ee.He was disappointed that she did not come.
  3. impose
  4. be mistaken
    Ayns shen t'ou mollit.That is where you are mistaken.
Derived terms[edit]
  • molteyr (deceiver, charlatan, duper, fraud, cheat, con man, impostor)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish moil (a mass, heap, pile), mul m (a globular mass, heap, lump).

Noun[edit]

moll m (genitive singular moll)

  1. mass, pile, heap, pack
  2. cluster, gathering, collection, huddle
  3. nave

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
moll voll unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

moll

  1. Alternative form of molle (rubbish)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Moll (minor), from Medieval Latin molle, of Latin mollis (soft), from earlier *molduis, from Proto-Italic *moldus, from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥dus (soft, weak), from Proto-Indo-European *mel- (soft, weak, tender).

Cognate with English moll, Icelandic moll, Czech moll, Hungarian moll and Swedish moll.

Noun[edit]

moll m (definite singular mollen, indefinite plural moller, definite plural mollene)

  1. (music) a minor scale (having intervals of a semitone between the second and third degrees, and (usually) the fifth and sixth, and the seventh and eighth)
    • 1907, Alexander Kielland, Samlede værker I (Mindeutgave), page 6:
      han vidste, at Hans blot kunde tre akkompagnementer; et i moll og to i dur
      he knew that Hans could only do three accompaniments; one in minor and two in major
    • 2012, Eivind Buene, Allsang:
      musikken skifter fra moll til dur, og trombonene kommer inn over de lange, blanke strykeakkordene
      the music changes from minor to major, and the trombones come in over the long, shiny string chords
    ren mollAeolian mode
    Antonym: dur
  2. (figuratively) a minor (timbre, that in classical and romantic music, can evoke or express melancholy)
    • 1852, Henrik Wergeland, Samlede Skrifter I, page 349:
      [løven] i moll maa klynke, som brølte før i dur
      [the lion] in minor must whine, which roared before in major
    • 1926, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, Samlede Digte I, page 169:
      gaa til moll fra dur
      go to minor from major
    • 1949, Johan Borgen, Jenny og påfuglen, page 108:
      kollisjoner mellom duren fra de inntrengende og stuens moll
      collisions between the drone from the intruders and the living room minor
    Antonym: dur

Etymology 2[edit]

From English mull, from Hindi.

Noun[edit]

moll m or n (definite singular mollen or mollet, indefinite plural moller or moll, definite plural mollene or molla)

  1. (textiles) mull (a thin, soft muslin)
    Coordinate term: linon

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From German Moll, from Latin mollis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moll m (definite singular mollen, uncountable)

  1. (music) minor (scale or key)

Antonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moll (indeclinable)

  1. (music) minor scale

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moll f

  1. feminine singular of mwll

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
moll foll unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.