voll

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See also: Voll, -voll, and voll-

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German foll, from Proto-Germanic *fullaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁nós. Compare Low German vull, Dutch vol, English full, Danish fuld, Swedish full.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

voll (comparative voller, superlative am vollsten)

  1. full; filled
  2. (colloquial) full (not hungry anymore)
  3. (colloquial) drunk

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

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Adverb[edit]

voll

  1. fully
  2. (colloquial, chiefly among the younger) very; quite; really

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German foll, from Proto-Germanic *fullaz, whence also Old English full, Old Norse fullr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

voll (masculine vollen, neuter vollt, comparative méi voll, superlative am vollsten)

  1. full

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vǫllr. Akin to English wold.

Noun[edit]

voll m (definite singular vollen, indefinite plural vollar, definite plural vollane)

  1. (agricultural) a meadow, grassy area, grassy plain
    • 1853, Ivar Aasen, "Barne-Minne", translated from Lord Byron, "Childish recollections"
      Som Morgonsoli [] blinkar dimt ut paa dan vaate Voll []
      The orb of day [] dimly twinkles o'er the watery plain []

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German wal, from Latin vallum.

Noun[edit]

voll m (definite singular vollen, indefinite plural vollar, definite plural vollane)

  1. rampart

References[edit]