vold

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See also: Vold

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vald, from Proto-Germanic *waldą, cognate with Swedish våld, German Gewalt.

Noun[edit]

vold c (singular definite volden, not used in plural form)

  1. violence
  2. force
  3. assault and battery
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German wal, from Proto-Germanic *wallaz, *wallą, cognate with English wall, German Wall. An early loan from Latin vallum.

Noun[edit]

vold c (singular definite volden, plural indefinite volde)

  1. bank
  2. embankment
  3. rampart, earthwork
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse vǫllr, from Proto-Germanic *walþuz (forest), cognate with German Wald. Doublet of val.

Noun[edit]

vold c (singular definite volden, plural indefinite volde)

  1. (archaic) field, meadow
Declension[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

vold

  1. imperative of volde

Further reading[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse vald.

Noun[edit]

vold m (definite singular volden)

  1. violence
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

vold

  1. imperative of volde

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

vold f (definite singular volda, uncountable)

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of vald

Etymology 2[edit]

From Norwegian Bokmål vold.

Noun[edit]

vold m (definite singular volden, uncountable)

  1. (pre-2012) alternative form of vald (violence)

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

vold

  1. (pre-2012) imperative of volda

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English vold, from Old English fald, falæd, falod, from Proto-West Germanic *falud.

Noun[edit]

vold

  1. A pen for domesticated animals.
    • 1867, “BIT OF DIALOGUE”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 111:
      Aar's neer a vear o aam to be drine-vold.
      There is no fear of them to fall into a dry furrow or trench.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 111