fully

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English fully, fulliche, volliche, from Old English fullīċe (fully), equivalent to full +‎ -ly. Compare German völlig (fully), Swedish fullt (fully).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʊli/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊli

Adverb[edit]

fully (comparative more fully, superlative most fully)

  1. In a full manner; without lack or defect.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess[1]:
      As soon as Julia returned with a constable, Timothy, who was on the point of exhaustion, prepared to give over to him gratefully. The newcomer turned out to be a powerful youngster, fully trained and eager to help, and he stripped off his tunic at once.
    • 2014, Sondra Higgins Matthaei, ‎Nancy R. Howell, Proleptic Pedagogy: Theological Education Anticipating the Future, →ISBN:
      It is a three-fold cycle by which we are oriented to the learning process: fostering greater awareness that affords greater intentionality to participate more fully, which then fosters greater awareness, and so on in an intensifying cycle of indwelling that which we seek to know so that the union of knower and known is incarnated in and through us.
    He fully met his responsibilities.
  2. In a full degree; to a full extent.
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page 7
      The lobule margins, furthermore, are arched away from the lobe, with the consequence that (when fully inflated) the abaxial leaf surface forms the interior lining of the lobule.
    He is fully capable of meeting his responsibilities.
    • 2011, William R. Murry, Becoming More Fully Human, →ISBN:
      This work therefore presents Humanism as a foundation for living in a way that is meaningful and fulfilling, and that enables us to become more fully human.
  3. As a minimum; at least.
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, in New York Times[2]:
      In polling by the Pew Research Center in November 2008, fully half the respondents thought the two parties would cooperate more in the coming year, versus only 36 percent who thought the climate would grow more adversarial.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (in a full manner):
  • (to a full extent):
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Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]