heap

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See also: Heap and Hieb

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Middle English heep, from Old English hēap, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz (compare Dutch hoop, Low German Hupen, German Haufen), from Proto-Indo-European *koupos (hill) (compare Lithuanian kaũpas, Albanian qipi (stack), Avestan 𐬀𐬟𐬂𐬐(kåfa))

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

heap (plural heaps)

  1. A crowd; a throng; a multitude or great number of people.
    • (Can we date this quote by Francis Bacon and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      a heap of vassals and slaves
    • (Can we date this quote by W. Black and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      He had heaps of friends.
  2. A pile or mass; a collection of things laid in a body, or thrown together so as to form an elevation.
    a heap of earth or stones
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Huge heaps of slain around the body rise.
    • 2012 May 9, Jonathan Wilson, “Europa League: RadamelF alcao's Atlético Madrid rout Athletic Bilbao”, in the Guardian[1]:
      Every break seemed dangerous and Falcao clearly had the beating of Amorebieta. Others, being forced to stretch a foot behind them to control Arda Turan's 34th-minute cross, might simply have lashed a shot on the turn; Falcao, though, twisted back on to his left foot, leaving Amorebieta in a heap, and thumped in an inevitable finish – his 12th goal in 15 European matches this season.
  3. A great number or large quantity of things.
    • (Can we date this quote by Bishop Burnet and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      a vast heap, both of places of scripture and quotations
    • (Can we date this quote by Robert Louis Stevenson and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      I have noticed a heap of things in my life.
  4. (computing) A data structure consisting of trees in which each node is greater than all its children.
  5. (computing) Memory that is dynamically allocated.
    You should move these structures from the stack to the heap to avoid a potential stack overflow.
  6. (colloquial) A dilapidated place or vehicle.
    • 1991 May 12, "Kidnapped!" Jeeves and Wooster, Series 2, Episode 5:
      Chuffy: It's on a knife edge at the moment, Bertie. If he can get planning permission, old Stoker's going to take this heap off my hands in return for vast amounts of oof.
    My first car was an old heap.
  7. (colloquial) A lot, a large amount
    Thanks a heap!

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Sranan Tongo: ipi

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

heap (third-person singular simple present heaps, present participle heaping, simple past and past participle heaped)

  1. (transitive) To pile in a heap.
    He heaped the laundry upon the bed and began folding.
  2. (transitive) To form or round into a heap, as in measuring.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act I, scene II, verses 40-42
      Cry a reward, to him who shall first bring
      News of that vanished Arabian,
      A full-heap’d helmet of the purest gold.
  3. (transitive) To supply in great quantity.
    They heaped praise upon their newest hero.
Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Adverb[edit]

heap (not comparable)

  1. (representing broken English stereotypically or comically attributed to Native Americans; may be offensive) Very.
    • 1980, Joey Lee Dillard, Perspectives on American English (page 417)
      We are all familiar with the stereotyped broken English which writers of Western stories, comic strips, and similar literature put into the mouths of Indians: 'me heap big chief', 'you like um fire water', and so forth.
    • 2004, John Robert Colombo, The Penguin Book of Canadian Jokes (page 175)
      Once upon a time, a Scotsman, an Englishman, and an Irishman are captured by the Red Indians [] He approaches the Englishman, pinches the skin of his upper arm, and says, "Hmmm, heap good skin, nice and thick.

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *haupaz. Cognate with Old Frisian hāp, Old Saxon hōp, Old High German houf. Old Norse hópr differs from the expected form *haupr because it is a borrowing from Middle Low German.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hēap m

  1. group
  2. heap

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

heap m or f (in variation) (plural heaps)

  1. (computing) heap (tree-based data structure)

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

heap c (plural heapen or heappen, diminutive heapke)

  1. heap, pile
  2. mass, gang, horde

Further reading[edit]

  • heap”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011