munt

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See also: münt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably derived from Northern Ndebele umuntu.

Noun[edit]

munt (plural munts)

  1. (Rhodesia, slang, originally military, pejorative, offensive, ethnic slur) A black person, usually a man.
    • 2006, Geoffrey Nyarota, Against the Grain: Memoirs of a Zimbabwean Newsman, Zebra Press, page 63:
      Munt was a derogatory term used by the [Rhodesian] security forces to refer to blacks.

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

munt (third-person singular simple present munts, present participle munting, simple past and past participle munted)

  1. (Australia, slang) To vomit (usually while drunk).

Etymology 3[edit]

Blend of man +‎ cunt

Noun[edit]

munt (plural munts)

  1. (slang) mangina

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mōns, mōntem.

Noun[edit]

munt m (plural munts)

  1. A heap

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch munte, from Old Dutch munita, from late Proto-Germanic *munitą, *munitō, from Latin monēta. Cognate to German Münze, English mint.

Noun[edit]

munt f (plural munten, diminutive muntje n)

  1. coin
    Synonyms: muntstuk
  2. currency
    Synonyms: munteenheid
  3. tails (side of a coin)
    Antonyms: kop, kruis
  4. mint (institution)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch mente, minte, from Latin mentha.

Noun[edit]

munt f (plural munten, diminutive muntje n)

  1. mint (plant), of genus Mentha
  2. (chiefly diminutive) confection flavored with mint
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Verb[edit]

munt

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of munten
  2. imperative of munten

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Anglo-Norman munter (to mount)

Verb[edit]

munt

  1. to mount

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mōns

Noun[edit]

munt m

  1. A hill, mound
  2. A mount or mountain

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mōns.

Noun[edit]

munt m (oblique plural munz or muntz, nominative singular munz or muntz, nominative plural munt)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of mont (mountain)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin mundus.

Noun[edit]

munt m (oblique plural munz or muntz, nominative singular munz or muntz, nominative plural munt)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of monde (world)