mint

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English minten, from Old English myntan ‎(to mean, intend, purpose, determine, resolve), from Proto-Germanic *muntaną, *muntijaną ‎(to think, consider), from Proto-Indo-European *men-, *mnā- ‎(to think). Cognate with Saterland Frisian mintsje, muntsje ‎(to aim, target), Dutch munten ‎(to aim at, target), Dutch monter ‎(cheerful, gladsome, spry), Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌽𐍃 ‎(muns, thought, opinion), Old English munan ‎(to be mindful of, consider, intend). More at mind.

Verb[edit]

mint ‎(third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

  1. (intransitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt; take aim.
  2. (transitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt, endeavor; to take aim at; to try to hit; to purpose.
  3. (intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To hint; suggest; insinuate.

Noun[edit]

mint ‎(plural mints)

  1. (provincial, Northern England, Scotland) Intent, purpose; an attempt, try; effort, endeavor.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English mynt, münet ‎(money, coin), from Old English mynet ‎(coin, money), from Proto-Germanic *munitą, *munitō ‎(coin), from Latin monēta ‎(place for making coins, coined money), from the temple of Juno Moneta (named for Monēta mother of the Muses), where coins were made; akin to Dutch munt ‎(currency, coin, mint), German Münze ‎(coin, coinage, mint), Danish mønt ‎(coin), and to Russian моне́та ‎(monéta, coin).

Noun[edit]

mint ‎(plural mints)

  1. A building or institution where money (originally, only coins) is produced under government licence.
  2. (informal) A large amount of money. A vast sum or amount, etc.
    That house is worth a mint
    It must have cost a mint to produce!
  3. (figuratively) Any place regarded as a source of unlimited supply; the supply itself.
    • Shakespeare
      A mint of phrases in his brain.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mint ‎(third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

  1. (transitive) To reproduce (coins), usually en masse, under licence.
  2. To invent; to forge; to fabricate; to fashion.
    • Francis Bacon
      titles [] of such natures as may be easily minted
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mint ‎(not comparable)

  1. Of condition, as new.
    in mint condition.
  2. (numismatics) In near-perfect condition; uncirculated.
  3. (philately) Unused with original gum; as issued originally.
  4. (Britain, slang) Very good.
    • 2014, Holly Hagan, Not Quite a Geordie
      And my God, what a house it was – it was mint! In all my life I had never set foot in such a beautiful place.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

A mint plant.

From Latin menta ‎(the plant), from Ancient Greek μίνθη ‎(mínthē), akin to Old Norse minta ‎(mint).

Noun[edit]

mint ‎(plural mints)

  1. Any plant in the genus Mentha in the family Lamiaceae, typically aromatic with square stems.
  2. The flavouring of the plant, either a sweet, a jelly or sauce.
  3. Any plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae.
  4. A green colour, like that of mint.
    mint colour:    
  5. A mint-flavored candy, often eaten to sweeten the smell of the breath.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mint ‎(comparative minter, superlative mintest)

  1. Of a green colour, like that of the mint plant.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mint

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of minnen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of minnen

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

mint

  1. (comparison) than, as ... as
    A kastély nagyobb, mint a kutyaház. ― The castle is bigger than the dog-house.
    Olyan nagy a házam, mint a tiéd. ― My house is as big as yours.
  2. as
    János mint zsűritag vett részt az eseményen. ― János took part in the event as a member of the jury.

Usage notes[edit]

In the context of comparison, mint starts a new clause, so a comma is needed before it.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(Expressions):

See also[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mint

  1. past participle of minne