hol

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Hol, HoL, hól, hòl, hol., hol-, hol', hôľ, høl, and höl

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch hol, from Middle Dutch hol, from Old Dutch *hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol (plural holle, diminutive holletjie)

  1. A hole, a hollow, a cavity.

Adjective[edit]

hol (attributive hol, comparative holler, superlative holste)

  1. hollow

Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulaz. Cognate with German hohl, Dutch hol, Saterland Frisian hol, English hollow, Icelandic holur, Westrobothnian hȯhl.

Adjective[edit]

hol

  1. (Uri) hollow

References[edit]


Bouyei[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol

  1. garlic

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hol

  1. second-person singular imperative of holit

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hol
  • Rhymes: -ɔl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch hol, from Old Dutch *hol, from Proto-West Germanic *hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą.

Noun[edit]

hol n (plural holen, diminutive holletje n)

  1. A hole, hollow, cavity
  2. (nautical) A cargo hold
  3. (vulgar) An anus, arsehole; both anatomical senses of butt
    Je hol zul je zelf moeten schoonmaken.
    You'll have to clean up your arse yourself.
  4. (by extension) Any other bodily cavity that resembles a hole
  5. An artificial opening such as a slit
  6. burrow (a hole or tunnel dug by a small animal, like a rabbit, used as a dwelling)
  7. (figuratively) An unsanitary and/or unpleasant place; shithole
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: hol
  • Negerhollands: hol
  • Arawak: hôle
  • Caribbean Hindustani: hol
  • Papiamentu: hòl

Adjective[edit]

hol (comparative holler, superlative holst)

  1. hollow, having an empty space inside
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of hol
uninflected hol
inflected holle
comparative holler
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial hol holler het holst
het holste
indefinite m./f. sing. holle hollere holste
n. sing. hol holler holste
plural holle hollere holste
definite holle hollere holste
partitive hols hollers
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Deverbal from hollen.

Noun[edit]

hol m (plural hollen, diminutive holletje n)

  1. A run, the action running
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Unknown, perhaps cognate with English hill. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

hol f (plural hollen, diminutive holletje n)

  1. A small height in the landscape, such as
    1. a hill (like the Utrecht city wall ruins)
    2. a sloping road (as in Rotterdam)

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

hol

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hollen
  2. imperative of hollen

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą, noun-derivation from *hulaz (hollow), from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-, *kewH- (hollow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol n (genitive singular hols, plural hol)

  1. hole
  2. cave
  3. (dentistry) cavity

Declension[edit]

Declension of hol
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative hol holið hol holini
accusative hol holið hol holini
dative holi holinum holum holunum
genitive hols holsins hola holanna

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

hol

  1. singular imperative of holen

Hungarian[edit]

ed  Table of Correlatives (cf. H. demonstrative adverbs)
question same every-/all no- relative some any else
this that ugyan mind(en)- se(m/n)- a- + qu. vala  akár
bár
más
who ki ő u mindenki senki aki v a b m
what mi ez az u u minden semmi ami /
amely
v a b m
which melyik mindegyik
mind
semelyik
egyik sem
amelyik v a b m
how hogy(an)
miként
így úgy u u mindenhogy
mindenhogyan
sehogy(an)
semmiképpen
(a)mint
ahogy(an)
v
v
a b
a b
m/m
m/m
whatlike
what kind
milyen
miféle
ilyen
efféle
olyan
afféle
u u mindenféle semmilyen
semmiféle
amilyen v
v
a b
a b
m
m/m
where hol itt ott u u mindenhol
mindenütt
sehol ahol v a b m
m
from wh. honnan innen onnan u u mindenhonnan sehonnan ahonnan v a b m
to where hova
hová
ide oda u u mindenhova
mindenhová
sehova
sehová
ahova
ahová
v
v
a b
a b
m
m
from
which way
merről erről arról u u mindenfelől semerről amerről v a b m
which way merre erre arra u u mindenfelé semerre amerre v a b m
why miért ezért azért u u mindenért semmiért amiért v a b m
how many hány ennyi annyi u u mind
az összes
sehány ahány v a b
how much mennyi semennyi amennyi v a b
what extent mennyire ennyire annyira u u (teljesen) semennyire amennyire v a b
what size mekkora ekkora akkora u u (az egész) semekkora amekkora v a b
what time mikor ekkor akkor u u mindig soha/sose(m)
sohase(m)
amikor v a b m
how long
how far
meddig eddig addig u u (végig)* semeddig ameddig v a b
*: Mindeddig/-addig mean “up until this/that point” (= egészen eddig/addig).
Csak following relative pronouns expresses “-ever”, e.g. aki csak (whoever);
is after “any” pronouns emphasizes “no matter”: akármit is (no matter what).
né- (some) forms compounds with few words.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uralic *ku.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hol

  1. (interrogative) where?
    Synonym: merre? (see also its Usage notes)
    • 1825, Mihály Vörösmarty, Zalán futása,[1] canto 1, lines 5–6, translation by Watson Kirkconnell and Adam Makkai:
      Hol vagyon, aki merész ajakát hadi dalnak eresztvén, / A riadó vak mélységet fölverje szavával, []
      Where is the one who, with lips all bold, could thunder a war-song / rousing the gloom of the deep and unsighty abysses, []

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words

Conjunction[edit]

hol

  1. nownow, sometimessometimes, eitheror
    Hol itt, hol ott bukkant ki egy delfin a vízből.Sometimes here, sometimes there, a dolphin would pop out of the water.
    Mindig van valami: hol áramszünet, hol csőtörés.There’s always something: either it’s a blackout or a burst pipe.
    Hol volt, hol nem volt, volt egyszer egy király.Once upon a time there was a king. (literally, “now there was, now there wasn’t…”)

Further reading[edit]

  • hol in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hol, from Proto-West Germanic *hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulaz (hollow).

Adjective[edit]

hol

  1. hollow, empty
  2. concave, sunken
  3. holey (full of holes)
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hol

  1. Alternative form of hole (whole)

Noun[edit]

hol

  1. Alternative form of hole (whole)

Adverb[edit]

hol

  1. Alternative form of hole (wholly)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol (plural hols)

  1. Alternative form of hole (hole)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol (plural hols)

  1. Alternative form of hole (hull)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hóll.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol m (definite singular holen, indefinite plural holer, definite plural holene)

  1. a low hillock, a mound in a bog or on a flat

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse holr.

Adjective[edit]

hol (masculine and feminine hol, neuter holt, definite singular and plural hole, comparative holere, indefinite superlative holest, definite superlative holeste)

  1. alternative form of hul

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse hol.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol n (definite singular holet, indefinite plural hol, definite plural hola or holene)

  1. form removed by a 2021 spelling decision; superseded by høl

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse holr, from Proto-Germanic *hulaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hol (masculine and feminine hol, neuter holt, definite singular and plural hole, comparative holare, indefinite superlative holast, definite superlative holaste)

  1. hollow

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hol. Akin to English hole and German Höhle.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol n (definite singular holet, indefinite plural hol, definite plural hola)

  1. alternative spelling of hòl

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse hóll.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol m (definite singular holen, indefinite plural holar, definite plural holane)

  1. alternative spelling of hól

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hol (hollow space, cavity).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hol n

  1. hole
Usage notes[edit]

Hol refers only to a hole in the ground. For any other kind of hole, þȳrel is used.

Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hōlą (vain speech, slander, calumny), from Proto-Indo-European *kēl-, *ḱēl- (invocation; to beguile, feign, charm, cajole, deceive).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hōl n

  1. calumny; slander
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hol, whence also Old English hol, Old Norse holr.

Adjective[edit]

hol

  1. hollow

Noun[edit]

hol n

  1. hollow

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: hol

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hulą.

Noun[edit]

hol n

  1. a hole
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hol

  1. strong feminine nominative singular of holr
  2. strong neuter nominative/accusative plural of holr

References[edit]

  • hol”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English hall, from Proto-Germanic *hallō. Doublet of hala (concourse, hall).

Noun[edit]

hol m inan (diminutive holik)

  1. hall, hallway
  2. lobby
    Synonyms: kuluar, lobby
  3. vestibule, anteroom
    Synonyms: przedsionek, przysienie, sień
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from holować,[1] from German holen.[2]

Noun[edit]

hol m inan

  1. haul, tow
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • hol in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • hol in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French hall.

Noun[edit]

hol n (plural holuri)

  1. hall
  2. lobby

Declension[edit]


Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian hol, from Proto-West Germanic *hol. Cognates include German hohl and West Frisian hol.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hol (inflected holle, comparative holler, superlative holst)

  1. hollow

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “hol”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English hall.

Noun[edit]

hol

  1. hall

Synonyms[edit]


Uzbek[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic ҳол (hol)
Latin hol
Perso-Arabic

Noun[edit]

hol (plural hollar)

  1. (grammar) adverb

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

hol

  1. to bawl

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 46