holt

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See also: Holt

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English holt, from Old English holt ‎(forest, wood, grove, thicket; wood, timber), from Proto-Germanic *hultą ‎(wood), from Proto-Indo-European *kald-, *klād- ‎(timber, log), from Proto-Indo-European *kola-, *klā- ‎(to beat, hew, break, destroy, kill). Cognate with Scots holt ‎(a wood, copse. thicket), North Frisian holt ‎(wood, timber), West Frisian hout ‎(timber, wood), Dutch hout ‎(wood, timber), German Holz ‎(wood), Icelandic holt ‎(woodland, hillock), Old Irish caill ‎(forest, wood, woodland), Ancient Greek κλάδος ‎(kládos, branch, shoot, twig), Albanian shul ‎(door latch).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hɒlt/, /həʊlt/

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt ‎(plural holts)

  1. A small piece of woodland or a woody hill; a copse.
  2. The lair of an animal, especially of an otter.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

holt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of hollen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of hollen

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

holt

  1. Third-person singular present of holen.
  2. Second-person plural present of holen.
  3. Imperative plural of holen.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old past participle of the verb hal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

holt

  1. dead

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt n ‎(genitive singular holts, nominative plural holt)

  1. hillock
    • Á Sprengisandi (“On Sprengisandur”) by Grímur Thomsen
      Þey þey! þey þey! þaut í holti tófa,
      þurran vill hún blóði væta góm,
      eða líka einhver var að hóa
      undarlega digrum karlaróm;
      útilegumenn í Ódáðahraun
      eru kannske að smala fé á laun.
      Hush, hush, hush, hush,
      a vixen dashed in the hillock,
      wanting to quench his thirst with blood.
      Or - is it someone calling,
      strangely, with a harsh voice?
      Outlawed men, in the vast waste land
      are secretly guarding their stolen sheep.
  2. (antiquated) wood

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English holt.

Noun[edit]

holt

  1. A small piece of woodland or a woody hill; a copse.
    Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes... -- Chaucer, Gen. Prologue, Canterbury Tales, ll. 5-6

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hultą.

Noun[edit]

holt n

  1. wood