holt

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See also: Holt and hǫlt

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English holt, from Old English holt (forest, wood, grove, thicket; wood, timber), from Proto-Germanic *hultą (wood), from Proto-Indo-European *kald-, *klād- (timber, log), from Proto-Indo-European *kola-, *klā- (to beat, hew, break, destroy, kill).

Cognate with Scots holt (a wood, copse, thicket), North Frisian holt (wood, timber), West Frisian hout (timber, wood), Dutch hout (wood, timber), German Holz (wood), Icelandic holt (woodland, hillock), Old Irish caill (forest, wood, woodland), Ancient Greek κλάδος (kládos, branch, shoot, twig), Albanian shul (door latch). Doublet of hout.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt (plural holts)

  1. A small piece of woodland or a woody hill; a copse.
  2. The lair of an animal, especially of an otter.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔlt

Verb[edit]

holt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of hollen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of hollen

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

holt

  1. inflection of holen:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the hol- stem variant of hal (to die) +‎ -t (past-participle suffix).[1]

Adjective[edit]

holt (not generally comparable, comparative holtabb, superlative legholtabb)

  1. (literary) dead, deceased
    Synonyms: halott, elhunyt
    Holt lelkekDead Souls (a novel by Nikolai Gogol)
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative holt holtak
accusative holtat holtakat
dative holtnak holtaknak
instrumental holttal holtakkal
causal-final holtért holtakért
translative holttá holtakká
terminative holtig holtakig
essive-formal holtként holtakként
essive-modal
inessive holtban holtakban
superessive holton holtakon
adessive holtnál holtaknál
illative holtba holtakba
sublative holtra holtakra
allative holthoz holtakhoz
elative holtból holtakból
delative holtról holtakról
ablative holttól holtaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
holté holtaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
holtéi holtakéi

Noun[edit]

holt (plural holtak)

  1. (literary) dead (a deceased person)
    Synonym: halott
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative holt holtak
accusative holtat holtakat
dative holtnak holtaknak
instrumental holttal holtakkal
causal-final holtért holtakért
translative holttá holtakká
terminative holtig holtakig
essive-formal holtként holtakként
essive-modal
inessive holtban holtakban
superessive holton holtakon
adessive holtnál holtaknál
illative holtba holtakba
sublative holtra holtakra
allative holthoz holtakhoz
elative holtból holtakból
delative holtról holtakról
ablative holttól holtaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
holté holtaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
holtéi holtakéi
Possessive forms of holt
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. holtom
2nd person sing. holtod
3rd person sing. holta
1st person plural holtunk
2nd person plural holtotok
3rd person plural holtuk

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words
Expressions

Etymology 2[edit]

From the hol- stem variant of hal (to die) +‎ -t (noun-forming suffix). For the ending, compare hit, tét, jövet, menet.[2]

Noun[edit]

holt (usually uncountable, plural holtak)

  1. (archaic, now only in certain phrases, chiefly with possessive suffixes) death
    Synonyms: halál, meghalás
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative holt holtak
accusative holtat holtakat
dative holtnak holtaknak
instrumental holttal holtakkal
causal-final holtért holtakért
translative holttá holtakká
terminative holtig holtakig
essive-formal holtként holtakként
essive-modal
inessive holtban holtakban
superessive holton holtakon
adessive holtnál holtaknál
illative holtba holtakba
sublative holtra holtakra
allative holthoz holtakhoz
elative holtból holtakból
delative holtról holtakról
ablative holttól holtaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
holté holtaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
holtéi holtakéi
Possessive forms of holt
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. holtom
2nd person sing. holtod
3rd person sing. holta
1st person plural holtunk
2nd person plural holtotok
3rd person plural holtuk
Derived terms[edit]
Compound words
Expressions

References[edit]

  1. ^ holt in Tótfalusi, István. Magyar etimológiai nagyszótár (’Hungarian Comprehensive Dictionary of Etymology’). Budapest: Arcanum Adatbázis, 2001; Arcanum DVD Könyvtár →ISBN
  2. ^ holt in Tótfalusi, István. Magyar etimológiai nagyszótár (’Hungarian Comprehensive Dictionary of Etymology’). Budapest: Arcanum Adatbázis, 2001; Arcanum DVD Könyvtár →ISBN

Further reading[edit]

  • holt in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse holt

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt n (genitive singular holts, nominative plural holt)

  1. hillock
    • Á Sprengisandi (“On Sprengisandur”) by Grímur Thomsen
      Þey þey! þey þey! þaut í holti tófa,
      þurran vill hún blóði væta góm,
      eða líka einhver var að hóa
      undarlega digrum karlaróm;
      útilegumenn í Ódáðahraun
      eru kannske að smala fé á laun.
      Hush, hush, hush, hush,
      a vixen dashed in the hillock,
      wanting to quench his thirst with blood.
      Or - is it someone calling,
      strangely, with a harsh voice?
      Outlawed men, in the vast waste land
      are secretly guarding their stolen sheep.
  2. (antiquated) wood

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English holt, from Proto-West Germanic *holt, from Proto-Germanic *hultą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt (plural holtes)

  1. A small piece of woodland; a wooded hill.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: holt, hoult
  • Scots: holt

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse holt, from Proto-Germanic *hultą. Akin to Swedish hult and German Holz. Doublet of holt (Etymology 2).

Noun[edit]

holt n (definite singular holtet, indefinite plural holt, definite plural holta)

  1. a grove
    Synonym: lund
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German of same origin as modern German Holz. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hultą, it is a doublet of holt (Etymology 1).

Noun[edit]

holt m or n (definite singular holten or holtet, indefinite plural holter or holt, definite plural holtene or holta)

  1. a pole or other piece of wood made for a specific purpose
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse holt, from Proto-Germanic *hultą. Akin to Swedish hult and German Holz. Doublet of holt (Etymology 2).

Noun[edit]

holt n (definite singular holtet, indefinite plural holt, definite plural holta)

  1. a grove
    Synonym: lund
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German of same origin as modern German Holz. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hultą, it is a doublet of holt (Etymology 1).

Noun[edit]

holt m or n (definite singular holten or holtet, indefinite plural holtar or holt, definite plural holtane or holta)

  1. a pole or other piece of wood made for a specific purpose
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Adjective[edit]

holt

  1. neuter of hol

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • hólt (alternative spelling)

Participle[edit]

holt (definite singular and plural holte)

  1. past participle of hola and hole

Verb[edit]

holt

  1. supine of hola and hole

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *holt, from Proto-Germanic *hultą.

Noun[edit]

holt n

  1. wood (the material)
  2. tree
  3. a wood, a forest

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • holt (I)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *holt, from Proto-Germanic *hultą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holt n

  1. wood

Descendants[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hultą.

Noun[edit]

holt n

  1. wood
    Synonym: skógr
  2. rough stony ridge

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • holt in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press