gale

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Gale, galé, galè, galę, and gałę

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English galen, from Old English galan (to sing, enchant, call, cry, scream; sing charms, practice incantation), from Proto-Germanic *galaną (to roop, sing, charm), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰel- (to shout, scream, charm away). Cognate with Danish gale (to crow), Swedish gala (to crow), Icelandic gala (to sing, chant, crow), Dutch galm (echo, sound, noise). Related to yell.

Verb[edit]

gale (third-person singular simple present gales, present participle galing, simple past galed or gole, past participle galed or galen)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To sing; charm; enchant.
    • (Can we date this quote by Court of Love and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Can he cry and gale.
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To cry; groan; croak.
  3. (intransitive, of a person, now chiefly dialectal) To talk.
  4. (intransitive, of a bird, Scotland) To call.
  5. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To sing; utter with musical modulations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gale (a wind, breeze), probably of North Germanic origin, related to Icelandic gola (a breeze), Danish gal (furious, mad),[1] both from Old Norse gala (to sing).

Noun[edit]

gale (plural gales)

  1. (meteorology) A very strong wind, more than a breeze, less than a storm; number 7 through to 9 winds on the 12-step Beaufort scale.
    • 1927-29, M.K. Gandhi, The Story of My Experiments with Truth, translated 1940 by Mahadev Desai, Part I, Chapter xii:
      With my mother's permission and blessings, I set off exultantly for Bombay, leaving my wife with a baby of a few months. But on arrival there, friends told my brother that the Indian Ocean was rough in June and July, and as this was my first voyage, I should not be allowed to sail until November. Someone also reported that a steamer had just been sunk in a gale. This made my brother uneasy, and he refused to take the risk of allowing me to sail immediately.
  2. An outburst, especially of laughter.
    a gale of laughter
    • 1972, International Association of Seed Crushers, Congress [proceedings]
      The slightest hint of smugness would have had the nation leaning over our shoulders to blow out the birthday candles with a gale of reproach and disapproval.
  3. (literary, archaic) A light breeze.
  4. (obsolete) A song or story.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Toone to this entry?)
Coordinate terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

gale (third-person singular simple present gales, present participle galing, simple past and past participle galed)

  1. (nautical) To sail, or sail fast.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English gaile, gawl, gawwyl, gaȝel, gagel, from Old English gagel, gagelle, gagille, gagolle (gale; sweet gale), from Proto-Germanic *gagulaz (gale; sweet-willow). Cognate with Scots gaul, gall (bog-myrtle), Dutch gagel (wild mytle), German Gagel (mytle-bush), Icelandic gaglviður (sweet-gale; myrtle).

Noun[edit]

gale

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. A shrub, also called sweet gale or bog myrtle (Myrica gale), that grows on moors and fens.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English gavel (rent; tribute), from Old English gafol.

Noun[edit]

gale (plural gales)

  1. (archaic) A periodic payment, such as is made of a rent or annuity.
    Gale day - the day on which rent or interest is due.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Awtuw[edit]

Noun[edit]

gale

  1. fish
    Nan gale tek-nak-ey po.
    We've been catching fish.

References[edit]

  • Harry Feldman. A Grammar of Awtuw. (Pacific Linguistics: Series B, 94.) (1986)

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

gale

  1. eagerness

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of galle.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gale f (plural gales)

  1. scabies; mange

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gale f

  1. plural of gala

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse gala

Verb[edit]

gale (imperative gal, present tense galer, simple past gol or galte, past participle galt)

  1. to make a sound characteristic of a rooster; to crow

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gale

  1. definite singular of gal
  2. plural of gal

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

gale (present tense gjel, past tense gol, supine gale, past participle galen, present participle galande, imperative gal)

  1. Alternative form of gala

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gale

  1. neuter singular of galen

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gale

  1. dative/locative singular of gała

Noun[edit]

gale

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of gala