gal

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Gal, GAL, Gâl, Gál, gäl, gal., -gal, gal-, Gal., and Gał
U+33FF, ㏿
SQUARE GAL

[U+33FE]
CJK Compatibility
[U+3400]

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡæl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æl

Etymology 1[edit]

From gallon.

Noun[edit]

gal (plural gal or gals)

  1. Abbreviation of gallon.

Etymology 2[edit]

Representing a nonstandard pronunciation of girl.

Noun[edit]

gal (plural gals)

  1. (colloquial) A young woman.
    Coordinate term: guy
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Japanese: ギャル (gyaru)

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortened from galileo.

Noun[edit]

gal (plural gals, symbol Gal)

  1. A galileo (unit of acceleration).

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gal. Cognate to English gall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal (uncountable)

  1. The bodily fluid bile

Bouyei[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tai *p.qaːᴬ (leg). Cognate with Thai ขา (kǎa), Northern Thai ᨡᩣ, Lao ຂາ (khā), ᦃᦱ (ẋaa), Shan ၶႃ (khǎa), Tai Nüa ᥑᥣᥴ (xáa), Ahom 𑜁𑜡 (khā), Zhuang ga.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. (anatomy) leg; foot

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gal (feminine gal·la, masculine plural gals, feminine plural gal·les)

  1. Gaulish, Gallic (of or pertaining to Gaul)
    Synonym: gàl·lic

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gals, feminine gal·la)

  1. Gaul (a person from Gaul)

Proper noun[edit]

gal m

  1. Gaulish (Celtic language that was spoken in Gaul)
    Synonym: gàl·lic

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Chinese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Short for galgame, borrowed from Japanese ギャルゲーム (gyaru gēmu), which is wasei eigo (和製英語; pseudo-anglicism), derived from gal +‎ game.

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. (ACG, video games) galge (video or computer game centered around interactions with attractive anime-style girls)
    gal  ―  tuī gal  ―  to play galge

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡaːˀl/, [ˈɡ̊æˀl]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Danish galæn, from Old Norse galinn (enchanted, mad), a past participle of gala (to sing, chant) (Danish gale (to crow)).

Adjective[edit]

gal (neuter galt, plural and definite singular attributive gale)

  1. crazy, mad, insane (mentally ill)
  2. mad, angry (showing temper)
  3. wrong (not the right one)
  4. bad

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse gal (shouting), derived from the verb gala (to sing, chant) (Danish gale (to crow)).

Noun[edit]

gal n (singular definite galet, plural indefinite gal)

  1. crow (the sound of a cock)
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. imperative of gale

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch galle, from Old Dutch galla, from Proto-Germanic *gallō.

Noun[edit]

gal f (uncountable)

  1. Bile, gall (yellow-green bodily fluid secreted by the liver).
  2. Bile, anger, wrath.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: gal
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: gali
  • Negerhollands: gal
  • Papiamentu: hal, gal

Etymology 2[edit]

Ultimately from Latin galla. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

gal f (plural gallen, diminutive galletje n)

  1. A gall (abnormal growth on a plant caused by foreign organisms).
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Emilian[edit]

Emiliano-Romagnolo Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eml

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gallus.

Noun[edit]

gal m

  1. cock

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gals)

  1. a unit of acceleration equal to one centimetre per second per second

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From gala (to crow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal n (genitive singular gals, no plural)

  1. crowing (of a rooster)
  2. yelling

Declension[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish gal, from Proto-Celtic *galā (ability) (compare Welsh gallu (be able)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal f or m (genitive singular gaile, nominative plural gala)

  1. warlike ardor
  2. valor, fury
  3. vapor, steam
  4. boiling heat
  5. puff, whiff (of smoke, hot air)
  6. fit, bout, turn
  7. demand

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (genitive singular gail, nominative plural gala)

  1. blusterer
    Synonyms: bliústar, bolscaire, galach

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gal ghal ngal
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Lithuanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A shortening derived from "gali (it may) būti (be)".

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

gál

  1. maybe, perhaps
    Synonym: galbūt

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English gāl (lustful, wanton), from Proto-West Germanic *gail, from Proto-Germanic *gailaz.

Adjective[edit]

gal (Early Middle English)

  1. lascivious, lustful
    • c. 1225, “Oðer dale: fif ƿittes”, in Ancrene Ƿiſſe (MS. Corpus Christi 402)‎[1], Herefordshire, published c. 1235, folio 15, verso; republished at Cambridge: Parker Library on the Web, January 2018:
      naƿt ane euch fleſchlich hondlunge: ah ȝetten euch gal ƿoꝛd: iſ ladlich vilainie []
      Not just each amorous caress, but even each lustful word is revolting depravity []
    • Sweche pinen he þolien schal þat her wes of his fles ful gal And wolde louien his fleses wil. — Eleven Pains of Hell, 1300
  2. overly fond of
    Gripes freteþ hoere mawen And hoere inward everuidel, Ne be þe þarof no so gal, Eft hoe werpeþ al in al. — Eleven Pains of Hell, 1300

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Nalca[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. tree

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse galinn, from gala (sing bewitching songs, in actuality bewitched by magical singing).

Adjective[edit]

gal (neuter singular galt, definite singular and plural gale, comparative galere, indefinite superlative galest, definite superlative galeste)

  1. insane; crazy; out of one's mind; mad
  2. incorrect; erroneous; wrong; illegal; morally reproachable
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Related to the verb gale.

Noun[edit]

gal n (definite singular galet, indefinite plural gal, definite plural gala or galene)

  1. crow ((instance of) rooster's crowing)
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. imperative of gale

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From gala (to howl).

Noun[edit]

gal n (definite singular galet, indefinite plural gal, definite plural gala)

  1. a crow, howl, scream
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation.

Proper noun[edit]

gal (upper case Gal)

  1. Abbreviation of galatarbrevet.

Etymology 3[edit]

Possibly from English. An abbreviation.

Symbol[edit]

gal

  1. symbol used to represent a gallon

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. imperative of gala

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gallus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (East Vivaro-Alpine) [ˈdʒal][1]
  • IPA(key): (Provençal) [ˈɡau̯]
  • IPA(key): (East Languedocien) [ˈɡal]
  • IPA(key): (West Languedocien) [ˈɡal]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gals)

  1. A cock, rooster

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Müller, Daniela. 2011. Developments of the lateral in Occitan dialects and their Romance and cross-linguistic context. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Toulouse.
  1. ^ Müller 2011: 43. Likewise for the other three pronunciations.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *gail.

Cognate with Old Saxon gēl, Dutch geil (salacious, lustful), Old High German geil (German geil (lustful)), Old Norse geiligr (beautiful). The Indo-European root may also be the source of Lithuanian gailùs (sharp, biting), Russian зело́ (zeló, very).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gāl (comparative gālra, superlative gālost)

  1. wanton, lustful; wicked
    And se Iouis wearð swa swyðe gal þæt he on his agenre swyster gewifode.
    And Jove became so depraved that he married his own sister.
    (Wulfstan, De Falsis Deis)

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: gal, gol
    • English: gole (dialectal)

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal m (oblique plural gaus or gax or gals, nominative singular gaus or gax or gals, nominative plural gal)

  1. A rock

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *galā.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal f (genitive gaile)

  1. ardor
  2. fury
  3. valor
    • c. 760, Blathmac mac Con Brettan, published in "A study of the lexicon of the poems of Blathmac Son of Cú Brettan" (2017; PhD thesis, National University of Ireland Maynooth), edited and with translations by Siobhán Barrett, stanza 130
      Co rígaib ránaib cét ngal   co láthib do·ruíchetar.
      With the noble kings of a hundred feats of valour,   they have taken revenge with warriors.

Inflection[edit]

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative galL gailL galaH
Vocative galL gailL galaH
Accusative gailN gailL galaH
Genitive gaileH galL galN
Dative gailL galaib galaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Unclassified terms derived from gal

Many derivatives of gal serve as verbal nouns to compounds of fichid (to fight).

Verbal nouns derived from gal

Gal is also a common as the second element of male given names in Old Irish. Despite all these given names being male, they inherit gal's feminine ā-stem declension.

Given names derived from gal

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Irish: gal
    • Irish: gal
    • Scottish Gaelic: gal

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
gal gal
pronounced with /ɣ(ʲ)-/
ngal
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of gala

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin.

Noun[edit]

Chemical element
Ga
Previous: cynk (Zn)
Next: german (Ge)

gal m inan

  1. gallium
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Named in honour of Galileo Galilei

Noun[edit]

gal m inan

  1. A galileo
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. genitive plural of gala

Further reading[edit]

  • gal in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gal in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Rohingya[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal (Hanifi spelling 𐴒𐴝𐴓𐴢)

  1. mouth

Romagnol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin găllum (rooster), accusative of Latin gallus (rooster).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Central Romagnol):
      • (San Zaccaria): IPA(key): [ˈɡaɐl]
      • (San Pietro in Vincoli): IPA(key): [ˈɡaɐl]

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural ghël)

  1. rooster (male domestic fowl)
    September 2012, Loris Pasini, E’ gal in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 15:
    E’ gal.
    The rooster.

References[edit]

  • Masotti, Adelmo (1999) Vocabolario Romagnolo Italiano (in Italian), Zanichelli, page 246

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Gallus.

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gali)

  1. a Gaul

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French gal.

Noun[edit]

gal m (plural gali)

  1. (physics) unit of measurement of acceleration, equal to 1 centimeter per second squared

See also[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

gal m (genitive singular gail, plural gail)

  1. verbal noun of gail (cry, weep)
  2. (act of) crying, wailing
  3. wail

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish gal (warlike ardour, fury, valour).

Noun[edit]

gal m (genitive singular gail, plural gail)

  1. burst of light/heat
  2. ardour
  3. valour
  4. fury
  5. vapour, steam

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
gal ghal
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “gal”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 gal”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *galъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡâːl/
  • Hyphenation: gal

Adjective[edit]

gȃl (Cyrillic spelling га̑л)

  1. (dated) black, dark (physical attributes)
  2. (dated) dark fur

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Somali[edit]

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. enter
    musqusha galenter the toilet

Sumerian[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gal

  1. Romanization of 𒃲 (gal)

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

gal

  1. present tense of gala.
  2. imperative of gala.

Anagrams[edit]


Zou[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gal

  1. war

References[edit]

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 44