howl

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English howlen, houlen, from Old English *hūlian, from Proto-West Germanic *hūwilōn, from Proto-Germanic *hūwilōną, *hiuwilōną (to howl), from Proto-Indo-European *kū-, *kew- (to howl, scream).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: houl, IPA(key): /haʊl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aʊl

Noun[edit]

howl (plural howls)

  1. The protracted, mournful cry of a dog, wolf or other canid; also of other animals.
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 117:
      [T]he fox was out on love-adventures, abused his rivals, and uttered scoffing screams and howls.
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 159:
      All at once the cat thrust her paw inside the ring again, but the tailor was quick as lightning and chopped the paw off. The cats set up a terrible howl, and away they rushed through the door as fast as they could.
  2. Any similar sound.
    The howl of the wind
  3. A prolonged cry of distress or anguish; a wail.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

howl (third-person singular simple present howls, present participle howling, simple past and past participle howled)

  1. To utter a loud, protracted, mournful sound or cry, as dogs and wolves often do.
  2. To utter a sound expressive of pain or distress; to cry aloud and mournfully; to lament; to wail.
  3. To make a noise resembling the cry of a wild beast.
  4. To utter with outcry.
    to howl derision

Translations[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *sāwol (compare Welsh haul, Breton heol; compare also Irish súil (eye)), from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun[edit]

howl m (plural howlyow)

  1. sun