haul

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English haulen, halen, halien ‎(to drag, fetch, compel, summon), partly from Old English *halian, holian ‎(to haul, drag); partly from Old French haler ‎(to pull, haul), from Frankish *halōn ‎(to haul, drag, fetch) or Old Dutch halen ‎(to haul, drag, fetch); all from Proto-Germanic *halōną, *hulōną, *halēną ‎(to call, fetch, summon), from Proto-Indo-European *kel(a)-, *kala- ‎(to call, shout, sound). Cognate with Saterland Frisian halia ‎(to get, fetch), Dutch halen ‎(to fetch, bring, haul), Low German halen ‎(to draw, pull), German holen ‎(to get, fetch), Danish hale ‎(to haul), Swedish hala ‎(to haul, pull, tug, hale). Related also to Old English ġeholian ‎(to get, obtain).

Verb[edit]

haul ‎(third-person singular simple present hauls, present participle hauling, simple past and past participle hauled)

  1. To carry something; to transport something, with a connotation that the item is heavy or otherwise difficult to move.
  2. To pull or draw something heavy.
    • Denham
      Some dance, some haul the rope.
    • Alexander Pope
      Thither they bent, and hauled their ships to land.
  3. To transport by drawing, as with horses or oxen.
    to haul logs to a sawmill
    • Ulysses S. Grant
      When I was seven or eight years of age, I began hauling all the wood used in the house and shops.
  4. (nautical) To steer a vessel closer to the wind.
    • Cook
      I [] hauled up for it, and found it to be an island.
  5. (nautical, of the wind) To shift fore (more towards the bow).
  6. (figuratively) To pull.
    • 2012 April 21, Jonathan Jurejko, “Newcastle 3-0 Stoke”, BBC Sport:
      The 26-year-old has proved a revelation since his £10m move from Freiburg, with his 11 goals in 10 matches hauling Newcastle above Spurs, who went down to Adel Taarabt's goal in Saturday's late kick-off at Loftus Road.
  7. To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked.

Derived terms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (to steer closer to the wind): veer
  • (to shift aft): veer

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

haul ‎(plural hauls)

  1. A long drive, especially transporting/hauling heavy cargo.
  2. An amount of something that has been taken, especially of fish or illegal loot.
    The robber's haul was over thirty items.
    The trawler landed a ten-ton haul.
  3. A pulling with force; a violent pull.
  4. (ropemaking) A bundle of many threads, to be tarred.
  5. Collectively, all of the products bought on a shopping trip.
  6. A haul video

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

haul

  1. second-person singular imperative of haulen

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh heul, from Proto-Celtic *sāwol (compare Cornish howl, Breton heol; compare also Old Irish súil ‎(eye)), from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /haɨ̯l/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /hai̯l/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

haul m (plural heuliau)

  1. sun

Derived terms[edit]