fore

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Fore, fóre, foré, forè, fôre, före, főre, fore-, and føre

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A development of the prefix fore-.

Adjective[edit]

fore (comparative former, superlative foremost)

  1. (obsolete) Former; occurring earlier (in some order); previous. [15th-18th c.]
    the fore part of the day
  2. Forward; situated towards the front (of something). [from 16th c.]
    the fore end of a wagon
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
      Crystal vases with crimson roses and golden-brown asters were set here and there in the fore part of the shop []
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

fore

  1. (golf) An exclamation yelled to inform players a ball is moving in their direction.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

fore (uncountable)

  1. The front; the forward part of something; the foreground.
    The fore was painted white.
    • 2002, Mark Bevir, The Logic of the History of Ideas:
      People face a dilemma whenever they bring to the fore an understanding that appears inadequate in the light of the other beliefs they bring to bear on it.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

fore (not comparable)

  1. In the part that precedes or goes first; opposed to aft, after, back, behind, etc.
  2. (obsolete) Formerly; previously; afore.
  3. (nautical) In or towards the bows of a ship.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

fore

  1. (archaic) simple past tense of fare

Anagrams[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fore

  1. Mixed mutation of bore.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

for +‎ -e

Adverb[edit]

fore

  1. far away

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

fore

  1. first-person singular present indicative of forer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of forer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of forer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of forer
  5. second-person singular imperative of forer

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

for +‎ -e

Adverb[edit]

fore

  1. (far) away, afar

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See foris.

Noun[edit]

fore

  1. ablative singular of foris

Etymology 2[edit]

Formally present active infinitive corresponding to fuī (I have been), irregular perfect indicative of sum (I am). From Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to become, be), cognate with Old English bēo (I become, I will be, I am). In classical Latin, the fu- forms of sum are mostly limited to the perfect tenses, but old Latin has alternate present and imperfect subjunctive forms fuam and forem (for classical sim and essem) suggesting the root could once be fully conjugated. After being incorporated in the conjugation of sum, the meaning of fore shifted from the original "to become" to the classical "to be going to be".

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fore

  1. future active infinitive of sum
Usage notes[edit]
  • Also used in the construction fore ut in place of a future passive infinitive in indirect discourse:
    Crēdō fore ut ea laudētur.
    I believe she will be praised.
    (literally, “I believe it to be going to be that she is praised.”)

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

fore

  1. fore

Descendants[edit]

  • Scots: fore
  • English: fore

Numeral[edit]

fore

  1. four

Conjunction[edit]

fore

  1. therefore

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fore f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. behaviour
  2. footprints, tracks
  3. (economics) ability, standing

Etymology 2[edit]

Derived from for (travel), from Old Norse fǫr, but made a weak noun. From earlier Proto-Germanic *farō.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fore f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. alternative form of for

Etymology 3[edit]

From fòr (furrow).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. to furrow

Etymology 4[edit]

Inherited from Old Norse fóðra.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. to fodder animals
    1. to breed, raise
  2. to gather food, fodder
  3. to feed
Related terms[edit]
  • fôr n (fodder)

Etymology 5[edit]

Made from fôr (lining of clothes)

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. (transitive) to line (clothes)
  2. (transitive) to clad with covering layers

Etymology 6[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Adjective[edit]

fore

  1. inflection of for:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fore

  1. Soft mutation of bore (morning).

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bore fore more unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.