veer

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Dutch vieren (to slacken).

Verb[edit]

veer (third-person singular simple present veers, present participle veering, simple past and past participle veered)

  1. (obsolete, nautical) To let out (a sail-line), to allow (a sheet) to run out.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, volume 12:
      As when a skilfull Marriner doth reed / A storme approching, that doth perill threat, / He will not bide the daunger of such dread, / But strikes his sayles, and vereth his mainsheat, / And lends vnto it leaue the emptie ayre to beat.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French virer.

Noun[edit]

veer (plural veers)

  1. A turn or swerve; an instance of veering.
    • 1917, Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society
      [] there is always a sudden, though small rise in the barometer, and a sudden drop of temperature of several degrees, sometimes as much as ten or fifteen degrees; there is also a sudden veer in the wind direction.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer (third-person singular simple present veers, present participle veering, simple past and past participle veered)

  1. (intransitive) To change direction or course suddenly; to swerve.
    The car slid on the ice and veered out of control.
    • 1697, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      And as he leads, the following navy veers.
    • 1796, Edmund Burke, Letters on a Regicide Peace
      An ordinary community which is hostile or friendly as passion or as interest may veer about.
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, in New York Times[1]:
      At this time in 2008, even as the global economy veered toward collapse, optimism about Washington ran surprisingly high.
    • 2021 February 24, Greg Morse, “Great Heck: a tragic chain of events”, in RAIL, number 925, pages 38, 39:
      As he neared a bridge over the East Coast Main Line near Great Heck, he lost control. His Land Rover left the carriageway and veered onto the hard shoulder before biting into the grass verge.
      [page 39] It ran derailed for about 500 yards before encountering a set of points, which caused it to veer into the path of an Immingham-Ferrybridge coal train, powered by Freightliner 66521 (one of a class of locomotive well-known for being well-built enough to destroy anything that got in its way).
  2. (intransitive, of the wind) To shift in a clockwise direction (if in the Northern Hemisphere, or in a counterclockwise direction if in the Southern Hemisphere).[1]
  3. (intransitive, nautical, of the wind) To shift aft.[1]
  4. (intransitive, nautical) To change direction into the wind; to wear ship.
  5. (transitive) To turn.
Antonyms[edit]
  • (of the wind, to shift clockwise): back
  • (of the wind, to shift aft): haul forward
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bowditch 2002

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch veer.

Noun[edit]

veer (plural vere)

  1. feather

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

veer

  1. plural of ve

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A contraction of veder, from Middle Dutch vedere, from Old Dutch fethara, from Proto-West Germanic *feþru, from Proto-Germanic *feþrō, from Proto-Indo-European *péth₂r̥ ~ pth₂én- (feather, wing), from *peth₂- (to fly). The sense "spring" is derived from the ability of feathers to resume their shape when bent.

Cognate with Low German Fedder, German Feder, West Frisian fear, English feather, Danish fjer, Swedish fjäder.

Noun[edit]

veer f (plural veren, diminutive veertje n)

  1. feather
    Synonym: pluim
  2. spring (e.g. metallic helix which resists stress)
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: veer
  • Indonesian: per (spring)

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of veren
  2. imperative of veren

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch vere, from Old Dutch feri, from Proto-Germanic *farjaną.

Cognate with German Fähre.

Noun[edit]

veer n (plural veren, diminutive veertje n)

  1. ferry
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Low German, from Middle Low German vêr, from Old Saxon fiuwar. Ultimately cognate to German vier.

Numeral[edit]

veer

  1. four (4)

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *veeri.

Noun[edit]

veer (genitive veere, partitive veert)

  1. edge

Declension[edit]


German Low German[edit]

Low German cardinal numbers
 <  3 4 5  > 
    Cardinal : veer
    Ordinal : veert

Etymology[edit]

From Low German, from Middle Low German vêr, from Old Saxon fiuwar. Ultimately cognate to German vier, English four.

Numeral[edit]

veer

  1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian and Münsterland) four (4)

Coordinate terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Jutish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vita.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. (Fjolde) to know

References[edit]

  • veer” in Anders Bjerrum and Marie Bjerrum (1974), Ordbog over Fjoldemålet, Copenhagen: Akademisk Forlag.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

veer m

  1. indefinite plural of ve

Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. Alternative form of veoir

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vidēre, present active infinitive of videō, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to know; see).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. to see

Descendants[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse viðra, related to veðr (weather).

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. let wind blow through something
Related terms[edit]