ever

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English evere, from Old English ǣfre, originally a phrase whose first element undoubtedly consists of Old English ā "ever, always" + in "in" + an element possibly from fēore (nominative feorh) "life, existence". Compare Old English ā tō fēore "ever in life", Old English feorhlīf ‎(life).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ever ‎(not comparable)

  1. Always.
    It was ever thus.
    • 1907, Robert W. Chambers, chapter IX, The Younger Set:
      “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; []. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, and from time to time squinting sideways, as usual, in the ever-renewed expectation that he might catch a glimpse of his stiff, retroussé moustache.
  2. At any time.
    If that ever happens, we’re in deep trouble.  He's back and better than ever.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 3, The Celebrity:
      Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and came very near to saying so.
  3. In any way.
    How can I ever get there in time?
  4. (informal) As intensifier.
    Was I ever glad to see you!  Did I ever!  After that experience, I will never ever do it again!

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ever ‎(not comparable)

  1. (epidemiology) Occurring at any time, occurring even but once during a timespan.
    • 1965, Reuben Hill, The family and population control: a Puerto Rican experiment in social change
      This family empathy measure is highly related to ever use of birth control but not to any measure of continuous use.

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Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *evur, from Proto-Germanic *eburaz, from Indo-European *h₁eperos. Cognate with Latin aper, Proto-Slavic veprъ ( > Serbian vepar).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ever m ‎(plural evers, diminutive evertje n)

  1. wild boar

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German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ever.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ever

  1. (colloquial, youth slang) ever (with superlative)
    Das war das geilste Konzert ever.
    That was the greatest concert ever.

Synonyms[edit]