ever

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ever, from Old English ǣfre, originally a phrase whose first element undoubtedly consists of Old English ā (ever, always) + in (in) + an element possibly from feorh (life, existence) (dative fēore). Compare Old English ā tō fēore (ever in life), Old English feorhlīf (life).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ever (not comparable)

  1. Always, frequently, forever.
    It was ever thus.
    • 1592, George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax, An Advertisement [] concerning Seminary Priests
      [] the Lord Treasurer, who ever secretly feigned himself to be a Moderator and Mollifier of the Catholicks Afflictions []
    • 1860, Florence Nightingale, Suggestions for Thought to the searchers after truth among the artizans of England., page 302:
      Let us ever remember that our conception, our comprehension, our feeling of God must be ever imperfect, yet should be ever advancing. We must not make God: we must find Him and feel Him more and more.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter IX, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; []. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, and from time to time squinting sideways, as usual, in the ever-renewed expectation that he might catch a glimpse of his stiff, retroussé moustache.
    • 1993, Nancy K. Florida, Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts: Introduction and manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta, SEAP Publications (→ISBN), page 9:
      The library staffs of the Karaton Surakarta's Sasana Pustaka, the Mangku- nagaran's Reksa Pustaka, and the Museum Radyapustaka were ever helpful and generous with their time.
    • 2007, Roman Frydman, Michael D. Goldberg, Imperfect Knowledge Economics: Exchange Rates and Risk, Princeton University Press (→ISBN)
      As with the rest of macroeconomics, the issues have to be rethought in a way that makes the ever-imperfect knowledge of market participants and policymakers an integral part of the analysis.
  2. Continuously, constantly, all the time (for the complete duration).
    People struggled to cope with the ever-increasing cost of living.
  3. At any time.
    If that ever happens, we’re in deep trouble
    He's back and better than ever.
    We've only ever talked on the phone.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 3, in The Celebrity:
      Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and came very near to saying so.
    • 2019 February 3, “UN Study: China, US, Japan Lead World AI Development”, in Voice of America[1], archived from the original on 7 February 2019:
      He said the study provides clear evidence that AI technologies are growing at a faster rate than ever and will continue to do so.
      (file)
  4. In any way.
    How can I ever get there in time?
  5. (informal) As intensifier following an interrogative word.
    Was I ever glad to see you!
    Did I ever!

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ever (not comparable)

  1. (epidemiology) Occurring at any time, occurring even but once during a timespan.
    • 1965, Reuben Hill, The family and population control: a Puerto Rican experiment in social change:
      This family empathy measure is highly related to ever use of birth control but not to any measure of continuous use.

Determiner[edit]

ever

  1. (dialectal and informal) Shortening of every
    • 1989, Connie Jordan Green, The War at Home, page 16:
      "Ever place you look there's houses and more houses."
    • 2011, Lee Smith, Oral History →ISBN
      Queen Anne's lace ever place you look.
    • 2011, Michael Blair, Nub and Bow in History, page 27:
      A sign at the entrance to the road going up Snake Hollow reads, “Snake Hollow is a wonderful place to be, Ever place you look there is a beautiful green tree. Snake Hollow makes you feel alive and free.” Lets keep it that way, for you and me.

References[edit]

  • ever at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ēver, from Old Dutch *evur, from Proto-West Germanic *ebur. Cognate with Latin aper, Proto-Slavic *veprь (wild boar).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ever m (plural evers, diminutive evertje n)

  1. wild boar, Sus scrofa

Synonyms[edit]

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German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ever.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ever

  1. (colloquial, youth slang) ever (with superlative)
    Das war das geilste Konzert ever.
    That was the greatest concert ever.

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ǣfre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛːvər/, /ˈɛvər/

Adverb[edit]

ever

  1. ever

Descendants[edit]

  • English: ever
  • Scots: evire, evir
  • Yola: eyver, ere

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

ever

  1. present of eve

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ever f

  1. indefinite plural of eve
  2. indefinite plural of eva (non-standard since 2012)

Anagrams[edit]