hep

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See also: hẹp and нер

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening.

Noun[edit]

hep (uncountable)

  1. (informal) hepatitis.
  2. Abbreviation of high-energy physics.
Usage notes[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alteration of hip.

Noun[edit]

hep (plural heps)

  1. (obsolete) A hip of a rose; a rosehip.

Etymology 3[edit]

US slang of unknown or disputed origin, first recorded 1903.[1] Robert Gold suggested that it is a variant of hip, from white jazz fans’ mishearing African American musicians,[2] but hep is attested earlier than hip. Jonathon Green suggests a connection to a 19th century interjection used to drive horses;[3] compare gee up.

Adjective[edit]

hep (comparative more hep, superlative most hep)

  1. (dated, US slang) Aware, up-to-date.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter IX:
      I was pleased, as I put him hep on the Wilbert-Phyllis situation and revealed the part he was expected to play in it, to note that he showed no signs of being about to issue the presidential veto.
  2. (dated, US slang) Cool, hip, sophisticated.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

hep (third-person singular simple present heps, present participle hepping, simple past and past participle hepped)

  1. (dated, US slang) To make aware of.
    I hepped him to the situation.

Etymology 4[edit]

From German hep or Hepp-Hepp, an interjection used to attack Jewish people. The origin of the German source is unknown, but may come from a goatherd’s call.[4]

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Interjection[edit]

hep

  1. (historical) A rallying cry in attacks on the Jewish people.

Noun[edit]

hep (uncountable)

  1. (usually reduplicated) An instance of crying hep!, especially as a call to attack Jewish people.
    • 1893, Emanuel Schreiber, Historians of Judaism in the Nineteenth Century[2], page 13:
      Let us hope that the modern “Hep-Hep” cry of Antisemitism of to-day will be accompanied by a similar level of Judaism.

References[edit]

  1. ^ hep, adj.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2018.
  2. ^ Robert S. Gold (1964) A Jazz Lexicon, OCLC 250719442
  3. ^ Jonathon Green (2019), “hep, adj.”, in Green's Dictionary of Slang[1]
  4. ^ hep, n.1 and int.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2018.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *skapa, related to hap.[1]

Noun[edit]

hep f (indefinite plural hepa, definite singular hepi, definite plural hepat)

  1. furrow, scratch

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “hep”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, page 145
Related terms[edit]

Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *sekʷo, from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (follow). Cognate to Welsh heb

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

hep

  1. without

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hep!

  1. (colloquial) go! (in ready, set, go)
  2. (colloquial) used as a generic interjection to express desire or surprise or to attract attention to what is said after

Turkish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hep

  1. altogether
  2. always

Usage notes[edit]

This adverb can function as a pronoun, taking several possessive forms: hepimiz (“all of us”), hepiniz (“all of you”), and, irregularly, for the third person singular, hepsi (“all of it”). These forms may then also take case endings, just like regular pronouns.

Related terms[edit]