Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/sekʷ-

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This Proto-Indo-European entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Indo-European[edit]

Root[edit]

*sekʷ- (imperfective)[1][2]

  1. to follow

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959), “sek-”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume III, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, pages 896-897
  2. ^ Rix, Helmut, editor (2001), “*sek-”, in Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben [Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, →ISBN, pages 525-526
  3. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015), “sekti I”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 392
  4. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*sekʷ-o-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 328
  5. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010), “ἕπομαι”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), volume I, with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 447
  6. ^ Cheung, Johnny (2007), “*hač”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 2), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 124-125
  7. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “sequor”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 555-556
  8. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*sagja- 1”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 420
  9. ^ Olsen, Birgit Anette (1999) The noun in Biblical Armenian: origin and word-formation: with special emphasis on the Indo-European heritage (Trends in linguistics. Studies and monographs; 119), Berlin, New York: Mouton de Gruyter, page 888

Root[edit]

*sekʷ-[1]

  1. to see

Notes[edit]

Some sources relate this root to the one above, suggesting that the meaning "see" derives from "follow with the eyes". It has been argued that this an unlikely development, given that "see" is a more basic and primary meaning than "follow", which is more abstract.[2] However, there is no constraint against basic meanings developing from abstract ones; compare e.g. Latvian redzēt (see) from *h₃reǵ- (stretch, etc.), and Tocharian AB läk- (see) from *leǵ- (gather).

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ringe, Don (2006) From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic, Oxford University Press
  2. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009) Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press
  3. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*sehwan-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 431-432
  4. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*seuni-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 434-435
  5. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008), “šākuu̯a-”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 812-815
  6. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “shoh”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, pages 425-426

Root[edit]

*sekʷ-[1][2]

  1. to say

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959), “sek-”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume III, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, pages 897-898
  2. ^ Rix, Helmut, editor (2001), “*sek-”, in Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben [Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, →ISBN, pages 526-527
  3. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*sekʷ-o-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 328
  4. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “īnsece / inquam”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 304
  5. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008), “*sočìti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 458
  6. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015), “sakyti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 387
  7. ^ Ringe, Don (2006) From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic, Oxford University Press, page 133
  8. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*sagjan-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 420
  9. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*skʷetlo-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 338-339
  10. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008), “*sokъ”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 459
  11. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “*sagō(n)-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 421